I have larger files if you are interested in printing. The larger resolution will support a 5×8, maybe 8×10. If you are missing from the photo, and want to be photoshopped in, send me a picture of you against this background in E2125 (taken with the lights on at around 3pm).

beforepicLOLclassphoto

See you at graduation!

 

Thursday schedule

  • Potluck – bring something good
  • PNW Group presentation
  • Interactive year-end review
  • LOL Jeopardy Game
  • Final name game
  • Class photo
  • Sign up for eval conferences
  • Turn in final papers and portfolios

Recommended readings – to encourage you to keep thinking about the present as the remains of the past.

The Case for Reparations by Ta Nehisi Coates. Altantic Monthly – 10 part discussion of persistent historical outcomes connected to slavery in the U.S.

Obama Skirts the Law by Karen Tumulty. Washington Post – the president’s subversion of congressional checks on his power in connection with the Bergdahl affair.

 

 

 

 

As announced in seminar last week -

Week 8

Thurs

Everyone – Rough draft of research paper due.

ILC students – Panel presentations for research topic, approach, and results.

Week 9

Mon – Memorial Day – class cancelled.

Thurs

Everyone – seminar on Taking Liberties by Susan Herman.

Internship students – Panel presentations of internship experience, research topic, approach, and results.

Week 10

Mon

Year end discussion, p2p writing exchange.

Thurs

Potluck, evals sign ups.

Portfolios due – inc. notes, seminar papers, final paper, self eval, and academic statement.

 

Tasks for Thursday Wk 4

1. Sign up for midterm conferences.

2. Three news articles – local, national, and international – that pertain to your research.

3. An annotated bibliography from your research, with extensive and meaningful annotations of at least six scholarly, peer reviewed sources.

 

Portfolio Preview – minimum contents for spring portfolio

1. Research notes, annotated bibliography, paper outline, at least one rough draft, one final draft.

2. Reading response papers for seminar readings.

3. Self eval, faculty eval, field supervisor report and contact information.

4. Academic statement. You are responsible to find out if this is required for your official transcript.

 

1) Find, bring in hard copy, and come prepared to discuss at least three scholarly, peer-reviewed sources that you will use in your final paper. Two articles, one book.

2) Finish reading, write a seminar response paper, and come prepared to discuss to Unequal Childhoods.

 

Artee’s Seminar

Joseph
Rickey
Kyle
Marquise
Ariety
Rita
Jonathan
KJ
Shelby
Ted
Kyla
Keryn
Patrick
Jenn
Bryce
Alex
Delaney
David
Meg

Jules’ Seminar

Shamont
Becca
Samuel
Laura
Beth
Joanna
Sher
Chelsea
Kathy
Marko
Samantha
Zachariah
Eric
John
Serafina
Colbi
Uriah
Natasha
Laniecia

 

Tasks – Due next Thursday, April 10

1) Good potluck recipe or purchase.

Find something interesting and bring it to the potluck. Avoid or clearly label any ingredients containing nuts or nut oils.

2) “Anchor book” and response paper for research project.

Look for and find one book that can best anchor and inform your research project for this quarter. It doesn’t have to (and probably should not) summarize your project or provide a direct blueprint for you to follow. In a typical “seminar paper” type written response to the book, articulate the jumping off point you’ll be using to approach your project.

Think about Wanted by Rachel Hall as an example. We used that book as a starting place in the program in Fall and Winter quarters, and it did two things for us. It gave us an overview of our timeline for the two quarters (it established our scope), and it provided key concepts that helped us organize our thinking and ideas (the outlaw, the police, and the vigilante viewer).

Bring your potluck dish, anchor book, and reading response paper to class with you on Thurs.

 

Spring Quarter

Required readings:

Wk 1
Start Something That Matters
by Blake Mycoskie. Paperback, 224 pages. Spiegel & Grau; Reprint edition (May 15, 2012). ISBN-13: 978-0812981445

Wk 2 & 3
Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, 2nd Edition
with an Update a Descade Later by Annette Lareau. Paperback, 480 pages. University of California Press; Second Edition, (September 20, 2011). ISBN-13: 978-0520271425

Wks 4 & 5
Power and Constraint: The Accountable Presidency After 9/11
by Jack Goldsmith. Hardcover, 336 pages. W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (March 12, 2012). ISBN-13: 978-0393081336

Wks 6 & 7
Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life
(Stanford Law Books) by Helen Nissenbaum. Paperback, 304 pages. Stanford Law Books (November 24, 2009). ISBN-13: 978-0804752374

Wk 8 & 9
Taking Liberties: The War on Terror and the Erosion of American Democracy
by Susan N. Herman. Paperback, 312 pages. Oxford University Press, USA (March 3, 2014). ISBN-13: 978-0199360826

Wk 10
Start Something That Matters
by Blake Mycoskie. Paperback, 224 pages. Spiegel & Grau; Reprint edition (May 15, 2012). ISBN-13: 978-0812981445

Optional readings:

The Wire (TV Milestones Series) by Sherryl Vint. Paperback, 136 pages. Wayne State University Press (March 15, 2013). ISBN-13: 978-0814335901

Prison Grievances: when to write, how to write by Terri LeClercq. Graphic Paperback, 66 pages. Captive Audiences (February 1, 2013). ISBN-13: 978-0615739755

 

Spring Classroom Schedule

Mon 12-3pm – B1105 – Writing Group

Thurs 12-5pm – Lib 1540 – Seminar, Progress Reports

Fri 1-5pm – B1105 – Film Series: The Wire

Here’s the text of the Academic Fair flyer we distributed on Weds:

Signature Required for Spring Admission

Spring is the final quarter of a year-long program and is reserved for students ready for advanced work. We will have regular class meetings Mon, Thurs & Fri afternoons, plus additional meeting schedules and assignments in connection with “in-program” off-campus internships and independent study and research. To come into the program at this point, new students must have previous study in Constitutional Law, Legal History, or its equivalent (4 credits) and U.S. History or its equivalent (4 credits), as well as develop plans for internship or individual study activities that must begin in week one. As faculty, we will be happy to help qualified new students make such arrangements, and final admission to the program will depend on timely and complete arrangements for individual plans. If you are interested, please contact us for information and support. younga@evergreen.edu; unselj@evergreen.edu

Seminar Readings

Start Something That Matters
by Blake Mycoskie. Paperback, 224 pages. Spiegel & Grau; Reprint edition (May 15, 2012). ISBN-13: 978-0812981445

The Wire (TV Milestones Series) by Sherryl Vint. Paperback, 136 pages. Wayne State University Press (March 15, 2013). ISBN-13: 978-0814335901

Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, 2nd Edition with an Update a Decade Later by Annette Lareau. Paperback, 480 pages. University of California Press; Second Edition, (September 20, 2011). ISBN-13: 978-0520271425

Power and Constraint: The Accountable Presidency After 9/11 by Jack Goldsmith. Hardcover, 336 pages. W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (March 12, 2012). ISBN-13: 978-0393081336

Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life (Stanford Law Books) by Helen Nissenbaum. Paperback, 304 pages. Stanford Law Books (November 24, 2009). ISBN-13: 978-0804752374

Prison Grievances: when to write, how to write by Terri LeClercq. Graphic Paperback, 66 pages. Captive Audiences (February 1, 2013). ISBN-13: 978-0615739755

Taking Liberties: The War on Terror and the Erosion of American Democracy by Susan N. Herman. Paperback, 312 pages. Oxford University Press, USA (March 3, 2014). ISBN-13: 978-0199360826

 

The War by Ken Burns

Challenge to Democracy (1944) by U.S. War Relocation Authority

Japanese Relocation (1942) by U.S. Office of War Information

Topaz (1945) by David Tatsuno internee

 
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