Tag Archives: Occupy. Social Movements

There is a Way Out of Here! Trump, Clinton, Stein and Beyond November 8, 2016

My Talk at the Post-Debate, pre 2016 Presidential Election Forum at Evergreen State College

by Peter Bohmer, October 20, 2016

I have watched the three presidential debates this year. Trump’s contempt for women, his anti-choice, anti-Mexican  and anti-Muslim immigrant stance, his stereotyping of Black and Latinos, his proposed tax cuts for the wealthy and the corporations was disgusting. His toxic machismo and not so coded racism and white nationalism were on full display.  Clinton, although not as bad never mentioned poor people, and called for and bragged about continued U.S. militarism. To Trump’s racist claims about electoral rigging and fraud in Black communities, his mentioning  of Philadelphia, St. Louis and Chicago;  Hillary Clinton  could have but didn’t respond with the past and present actual racist voter suppression, especially by Republicans  but also many  Democrats in limiting voting by people with felonies, requiring multiple ID’s, making registration and voting difficult, especially in low income communities. Also these three debates were limited by no questions about one of the central issues of the day, climate change, and the excluding of the Green Party Presidential candidate, Jill Stein and the Libertarian Party candidate, Gary Johnson. … (see link above)

Connecting the $15 an Hour Movement to the Movement for Racial Justice and other Social Movements

Connecting $15 an Hour to Movement for Racial Justice and to other Social Movements.

by Peter Bohmer, September 26, 2015

At the Working Washington organized Gathering and Rally at Heritage Park, Olympia, Washington

Working Washington and the fight for $15 an hour is a very important movement and I want to thank the organizers and all of you for attending this gathering. You are involved in this necessary struggle for economic justice. I recently returned from a month in Greece where because of inhuman policies forcing Greece to cut government spending, cut pensions, lower the minimum wage and raise taxes on basic goods and services, unemployment, poverty, low wages and job security are even worse than in the U.S. Many Greek people asked me about important issues and social movements for justice in the United States and I usually mentioned the ones for climate justice, $15 an hour and a living wage, and the Black Lives Matter movement that has focused on exposing and stopping police shooting of Black people.

$15 an Hour: Its Time has Come!

First a little about significance of the fight for $15 and the statewide Working Washington organization. Since the 1970’s, the gaps between the rich and poor have grown significantly in the United States. The top 1% today takes more than 20% of national income; the average household in the poorest 20% of the population earns about 1/100th of the top 1%. The 2011 Occupy Wall Street movement made public the obscene inequality in the United States between the 1% and the 99%. In Olympia, four years ago, Olympia residents occupied the land where we are standing for more than two months as part of the national Occupy Movement. … (Connect to link above to read the entire talk)

 

Interview of Peter Bohmer by Kourosh Ziabari

Interview on Solidarity, Occupy and U.S.-Iran Relations.

What follows are my answers to a written interview from  Kourosh Ziabari, a writer and reporter for the Fars News Agency,  an Iranian foreign policy news and analysis website. I submitted the following answers to Kourosh Ziabari’s six questions on August 4, 2015 and slightly revised them on September 18, 2015.

 

Question 1- For many years, you’ve been a political activist protesting racial discrimination across the United States, as well as other forms of social injustice. You’ve also organized solidarity movements with the people of crisis-hit countries like Vietnam, Puerto Rico and Cuba. How does the US government perceive your activism and how does it react to you? Are such egalitarian and liberal movements ever taken seriously by the White House? Do they leave any impact on the major decisions of the US government and its institutions?

My answer.
My own active opposition for many years to the U.S. war in Vietnam is probably what I am proudest of in my life. The millions of people in the United States outside the military but also inside the military deserve credit for actively opposing their government’s waging of a murder, immoral and illegal war. Of course, the people who deserve the most credit are the Vietnamese people who opposed the U.S. occupation and war. … (see link above)