Robbie McClaran: Ordinary People

Coming Spring 2014 Galerie Fotoland is pleased to introduce an exciting new exhibition from Portland based Robbie McClaran. 

 

Opening Reception April 3rd (4:30-6:30pm) – On view through May 16th 2014

Ordinary People is an ongoing series is of portraits which highlight the lives of “regular” people from varying walks of life and from all over the country. His images are captioned with details of the subject’s story– often revealing a dark past and a history of struggle and grief.

 

McClaran has been documenting American people and landscapes for over thirty years. He has exhibited widely, and has been published in many major magazines, including The New York Times Magazine, Time, Smithsonian, Esquire, and Rolling Stone.

 

For more information on this series or to see more of McClaran’s work please visit his website at http://mcclaran.com/

 

At age 15 Michah Lewis was placed in foster care due to her Mother’s drug addiction. Two years later she ran away to Las Vegas and was living on the streets, using methamphetamine and other drugs. After she became pregnant with her second child (she lost parental rights to her first child due to her drug use), and determined to get clean, she was accepted into Janus Youth Bridge House. Michah, age 19 at the time of this photograph, is clean and sober, attends AA meetings with her Mother and is working to complete her education, get a decent job and be a good mother to her kids. Photo copyright - Robbie McClaran

At age 15 Michah Lewis was placed in foster care due to her Mother’s drug addiction. Two years later she ran away to Las Vegas and was living on the streets, using methamphetamine and other drugs. After she became pregnant with her second child (she lost parental rights to her first child due to her drug use), and determined to get clean, she was accepted into Janus Youth Bridge House. Michah, age 19 at the time of this photograph, is clean and sober, attends AA meetings with her Mother and is working to complete her education, get a decent job and be a good mother to her kids. Photo copyright – Robbie McClaran

 

Larry and Sheryl Nims live on 40 acres near Kamiah, Idaho, which they homesteaded in the early seventies. Virtually self-sufficient, they built their home from wood hand cut from trees grown on their land. They grow their own food and use few modern conveniences such as electricity. During the early nineties they became outspoken opponents of white supremacists that had moved into the community. Photo copyright - Robbie McClaran

Larry and Sheryl Nims live on 40 acres near Kamiah, Idaho, which they homesteaded in the early seventies. Virtually self-sufficient, they built their home from wood hand cut from trees grown on their land. They grow their own food and use few modern conveniences such as electricity. During the early nineties they became outspoken opponents of white supremacists that had moved into the community. Photo copyright – Robbie McClaran

 

Peggy McDowell was six months pregnant when she suffered a massive cerebral aneurysm and was declared brain dead. She was kept on life support for two months until the birth of her son by cesarean section. The baby (shown with brothers Eddie and Charlie and sister Laura) was named Joshua Moses because his family believed he was a miracle baby. Photo copyright - Robbie McClaran

Peggy McDowell was six months pregnant when she suffered a massive cerebral aneurysm and was declared brain dead. She was kept on life support for two months until the birth of her son by cesarean section. The baby (shown with brothers Eddie and Charlie and sister Laura) was named Joshua Moses because his family believed he was a miracle baby. Photo copyright – Robbie McClaran

 

After Trinity Gramkow, then 14, stayed out all night partying with friends, her mother, concerned about her daughter’s whereabouts, called police for assistance. When Trinity returned home she was taken from her parents and placed in the Plankinton, South Dakota boot camp for juvenile offenders. While in custody Trinity was subjected to routine humiliation including a method of restraint called four pointing, and having her clothes cut off. One night, in a suicidal rage, Trinity along with a group of girls broke light bulbs and cut their arms as guards merely watched. The girls were not treated for their injuries for more than four hours. After her release Trinity entered a public school where a shoving match resulted in her being re-incarcerated until she was an adult.  -Photo copyright - Robbie McClaran

After Trinity Gramkow, then 14, stayed out all night partying with friends, her mother, concerned about her daughter’s whereabouts, called police for assistance. When Trinity returned home she was taken from her parents and placed in the Plankinton, South Dakota boot camp for juvenile offenders. While in custody Trinity was subjected to routine humiliation including a method of restraint called four pointing, and having her clothes cut off. One night, in a suicidal rage, Trinity along with a group of girls broke light bulbs and cut their arms as guards merely watched. The girls were not treated for their injuries for more than four hours. After her release Trinity entered a public school where a shoving match resulted in her being re-incarcerated until she was an adult. -Photo copyright – Robbie McClaran