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Welcome to the Science Support Center.
We are located in Lab 1 room 2059 at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA.
Our phone number is (360) 867-6489
Our email address is ScienceSupportCenter@evergreen.edu
Our 2014/2015 Academic Year hours are as follows;
Monday through Friday
8:30am – 1pm
2pm – 4:30pm
Weeks 1 – 10 Fall, Winter and Spring Quarter
We will be open for returns by appointment during Evaluation Weeks.
We will be closed during break weeks.
Cheers, The Management

PLATO Lecture Series 2015

PLATO Lecture Series 2015

Computer-aided Environmental Science; Fridays 12-1 pm in Lecture Hall 2

“Integrating Social Evolution and High Throughput Genomics to Understand how Ecosystems Evolve”

Friday January 16, 2015: Dr. Joseph K. Bailey from the University of Tennessee- Knoxville, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Dr. Bailey is an evolutionary ecologist broadly interested in how species interactions link genes and ecosystems, how natural selection operates in a community context, and how these processes scale geographically and with genetic resolution (i.e., small molecular differences to sub-population structure). He takes an integrative view of natural systems and has worked with native and introduced plants and herbivores, from microbes to mammals, linking genes to ecosystems. His talk will discuss high-throughput genomic methods and big data analysis to explore the interconnections between plants and microbial symbionts to affect ecosystem function. For further information, please see Dr. Bailey’s website: http://eeb.bio.utk.edu/peopletwo/joseph-bailey/

Olympia Science Cafe January 2015

This month’s Olympia Science Cafe is tomorrow!

 

Our January topic is: “The Shades of White and the Birth of Blue”
Details: “Modern color terms flow from the blacksmith’s forge, Newton’s prisms,
17th century art and movies like “Gone With the Wind”. We
will follow the trails of human perception and scientific measurement
of light as they converge into everyday terms used for selecting LED
light bulbs. The first practical diodes that generated radiation
came in 1953. We at Pacific Mercury Television saw the possibility,
of using IR LEDs to activate remote control volume and change
channels. Costs would be high, and color television took priority.
These hands on (eyes on) experiences will start our trek thought the
development of colored LEDs, and solve the “450 Lumens vs 800 Lumens”
reading lamp. We will also examine the implications of the
psychological perception of light and color and Dr. Mariana Figueiro’s
recent paper, “The Light Therapeutic”. (Most of us assume this
is just part of getting old. Not Figueiro. She reckons more exposure
to bright light by day could help keep the doctor away.)”

Ralph Dodds has a degree in Engineering/Electronics from California State
University -Los Angeles, with further training in patent and purchasing law,
operations research, and education. Over his career, he has worked in
a variety of areas of engineering from circuits and hardware design
to project management and patent issues. Now retired and living with his
wife, Beatty, in Panorama, he still tries to keep up with trends in
science and technology.
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Science Café of Olympia meets each month on the second Tuesday. It provides an informal atmosphere where people with and without scientific background can meet to deepen their understanding of interesting topics in science and technology. After a presentation by an expert in the field, the meetings are opened for discussion. Science Cafés are found nationwide and are loosely affiliated with the U.K.-based Cafe Scientifique, an international organization promoting public engagement with science.

Event date:
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 – 7:00pm
Event address:
509 E 4th Ave
OlympiaWA 98501

 

Welcome to Winter Quarter 2015!

All of us here at the SSC hope that you had a wonderful break whether you traveled far or stayed near.

We are looking forward to seeing what kinds of projects start rolling in and as always we are here to help you with all of your science needs.

Happy Winter Quarter!

-The folks at the SSC

Nice Ash

Science Cafe October 14th 2014

Please bring a friend and join us for the next Olympia Science Café.

 

When:     7:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Where:    Orca Books      509 East 4th Avenue, Olympia      Phone 360.352.0123

 

Our  October topic is Astrobiology: Life in its Cosmic Context

Space missions have given us hints of planets and moons in the Solar System that may have once been inhabited or perhaps possess life today. At the same time, recent astronomical data show that most stars have planets around them. Closer to home, we’re learning more about the vast range of habitats for microbes on Earth and signs of life in Earth’s earliest rocks from billions of years ago. Given these findings, the new interdisciplinary science of astrobiology asks: How did life originate and evolve on Earth? Are we alone in the universe? And how should we look for life beyond Earth?

In this talk, David Catling will explain highlights from the latest scientific research in astrobiology. Dr. Catling is a Professor in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences and the cross-campus Astrobiology Program at the University of Washington, Seattle. He participates in research for NASA’s Astrobiology Institute and was part of NASA’s science team for the Phoenix Lander that successfully landed in the arctic of Mars in 2008. He’s the author of Astrobiology: A Very Short Introduction published in 2014 by Oxford University Press, which explains astrobiology for a general audience.

November Topic and Speaker:  To Be Announced

Science Café of Olympia meets each month on the second Tuesday. It provides an informal atmosphere where people with and without scientific background can meet to deepen their understanding of interesting topics in science and technology. After a presentation by an expert in the field, the meetings are opened for discussion. Science Cafés are found nationwide and are loosely affiliated with the U.K.-based Cafe Scientifique, an international organization promoting public engagement with science.

Some of the organizers of Science Café of Olympia are affiliated with the Puget Sound Chapter of The American Chemical Society.

 

Welcome back!

Hello wonderful people! I hope you enjoyed your summer.

We’ve been having little work parties here this week, training our new employees and getting things organized for the 2014/2015 academic year.

A few important changes you should note are happening here this year -

Safety goggle rentals to students will now be $3 a day. Week 1 of each quarter will be a grace period.

Students will now be charged late fines – unfortunately we had a few folks who were abusing the system last year and we need to change our policies accordingly. So, remember to call or email us when you need to renew equipment, in order to avoid late fees.

We’re really looking forward to seeing you this fall.

Cheers!

Happy Summer!

It’s Week 1 of Summer Quarter and we’re shifting in to summer hours.

We’ll be open Week 1 through Week 10, Monday through Friday from

10 am until noon

and

1pm until 3 pm.

Cheers,

The Management

Olympia Science Cafe

Please bring a friend and join us for the next Olympia Science Cafe.

When:     7:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Where:    Orca Books      509 East 4th Avenue, Olympia      Phone 360.352.0123

 

Our March topic is Mercury cycling at the Earth’s surface: Working to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources.

Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed toxic metal that is ubiquitous in the environment. Atmospheric mercury that is deposited to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems can be converted to methylmercury, which is a potent neurotoxin that is bioaccumulated in food webs. Importantly, anthropogenic activities have increased the amount of mercury actively cycling at the Earth’s surface by approximately 3-fold, stimulating interest in this pollutant. Recent analytical advancements have allowed the use of mercury isotopic compositions to distinguish between specific natural and anthropogenic sources and offer an important tool to improve our understanding of global mercury cycling.

Our speaker this month is Dr.  Abir Biswas, Professor of Geology/Chemistry at The Evergreen State College.
 

April 2014 Speaker:

Dr. Tara W. Hudiburg
Energy Biosciences Institute
University of Illinois, Urbana

 

 

Sincerely,

Dharshi Bopegedera,  Ph.D.

Member of the Faculty (Chemistry)

The Evergreen State College

Lab I, Room 2006

Olympia, WA 98505

 

email: bopegedd@evergreen.edu

voice: (360) 867-6620

fax: (360) 867-5430

 


Summer Internship opportunities in health care

Center for Connected Health (CCH) Interns (for undergraduate and graduate students)

 

The Center for Connected Health (CCH) is accepting applications for undergraduate and graduate student interns for summer 2014.
As a summer intern at CCH, you will be a member of an interdisciplinary research team comprised of clinicians, social and behavioral scientists, public health and healthIT professionals. Interns will participate in day-to-day CCH activities, including meetings with collaborators from affiliate institutions, other Partners centers, and corporate sponsors.
Graduate interns must select a research focus area and propose a project that can be completed during the 10-week summer internship. Projects may consist of exhaustive literature reviews, identifying funding opportunities and crafting a research proposal, secondary data analysis, and the design and collection of data to answer specific research questions. For all projects, graduate interns will work closely with Center research mentors and are expected to collaborate on co-authored reports, research proposals, or manuscripts due at the end of the summer program. Additionally, graduate interns will be expected to mentor and work effectively with undergraduate interns to complete projects. Three or four graduate students interns will be accepted for the summer internship.
Undergraduate interns will have a general interest in healthcare delivery and technology. During the summer, undergraduate interns will work with the CCH research staff and graduate interns on a variety of programs and research projects. Tasks could include, but are not limited to literature reviews, survey design, focus group coordination, data analysis, team presentations, patient recruitment/retention and overall administrative support. At the conclusion of the summer, undergraduate interns will complete a two-page summary of their activities and describe what they have learned during the internship program. CCH is planning to accept between two and five undergraduate interns.
Applications are due by March 17, 2014.
For more information and to apply, please review: http://www.connected-health.org/media/19514501/2014 cch summer internship program application instructions.pdf

 

You can also view this post on the CCH website: http://www.connected-health.org/about-us/careers.aspx

 

——————————————————————–
Timothy M. Hale, PhD
Research Fellow
Partners Center for Connected Health
Harvard Medical School

Office:
25 New Chardon Street 321M
Boston, MA 02114

Contact:
617.643.9852  (office)
617.228.4624  (fax)
tmhale@mgh.harvard.edu  (email)