Author: Anne de Marcken

Blog Prompt: Week 4

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than next Friday, 10:00am.

Objective:
“I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking.” Christopher Isherwood.

Attempt to write as if you are a camera, not thinking, only recording, capturing the essence of a scene, a moment, an event, a person…rather than explaining.

Prompt:
Using words, capture one or more “snapshots” per post.

Try not to use abstract words like “amazing,” “ugly,” “beautiful,” “incredible,” etc.

Capture descriptive details of action, setting, objects, and people. Be specific. Be concrete.

Resist indirect discourse: thoughts and feelings that cannot be observed.

Blog Community Service:
Throughout the week, read and respond to your classmates’ posts. Remember, critique is reserved for structured workshop settings. Be respectful and encouraging.

Formal Requirements:

  • Every post must be text-based.
  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • There is no minimum or maximum length for this assignment. Keep the publishing format in mind.

 

Blog Prompt: Week 3

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am.

Objective:
Using the looping technique practiced in class and to create your posts last week, use the writing of your classmates to expand your view and deepen your inquiry of personal and cultural narratives through creative writing. Keep in mind ideas explored during Day of Absence/Day of Presence…notice how you are absent and/or present in the writing of others and in your own writing…notice who is absent and who is present in your own writing. Any given narrative leaves out almost all of life; notice the choices you make about what and who  to make space for and how.

Prompt:

  1. Every day, read a variety of your classmates’ blog posts from the previous week. Make it your aim to have read at least one post by each classmate by the end of the week.
  2. Every day, select one of these posts to use as the leaping-off point into your own writing. Work from a variety of people’s posts—a different classmate each day. Choose posts that inspire you in a variety of ways; choose some you relate to and others that are foreign to your own experience/understanding/style.
  3. Draw one line from the selected post.
  4. Write this line on “a fresh page” outside the blog environment.
  5. Write for 5 minutes, drawing from your own experiences, questions and observations.
  6. Read what you just wrote. This is not your blog post.
  7. Pull forward one line.
  8. Write this line on “a fresh page.”
  9. Again, write for 5 minutes.
  10. Read. This still is not your blog post.
  11. Select a line.
  12. Use this line to start the final loop; write it on a fresh page.
  13. Write for 5 minutes.
  14. Reread this. Still not your blog post.
  15. Now, having done all this generative, exploratory work, write again—synthesize, refine, edit. Craft a finished paragraph that synthesizes the ideas, feelings, observations and images that issued from the loops. To “craft” is to pay attention to the ways form and content work together to convey meaning. This final short piece may be a “snapshot,” a scene, a nugget of insight, a series of questions…something that feels complete in its own way.
  16. This is your post! Copy and paste it into your blog.
  17. IMPORTANT: At the start of each post, before your own finished writing:
    1. copy the original line you used as your inspiration in quotes,
    2. credit the author by first name only,
    3. hyperlink the line to its source. Use Hypertext How-To for help.

Note: A “Looping How-to” is been posted separately. It provides a tiny bit more guidance on the looping exercise.

Formal Requirements:

  • Every post must be text-based.
  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • There is no minimum or maximum length for this assignment. Keep the publishing format in mind.

Blog Prompt: Week 2

Week 2 is the week of Day of Absence and Day of Presence. In honor of this, and as a way of informing all the writing and reading and listening and thinking we will do all quarter, this week’s posts will respond to the writing of women of color. Due: 5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am. Prompt: Each day, read or listen to a poem by a woman of color that is available online. Draw a line from that poem as the starting point for the “looping” process practiced in class on Friday of Week 1 and described below. Your can choose to make your first post in response to either: Audre Lorde’s poem, “Power” (1978) or Joshua Jennifer Espinoza’s poem, “I Dream of Horses Eating Cops” (2015) Whichever you don’t use for your first post, you can always use for another!   IMPORTANT: At the start of each post, before your own finished writing: Provide the author’s name and the name of the poem that you used as inspiration with a hyperlink to the source. Use “Hypertext How-To” for help, found in Canvas “Program Resources” module. Looping process:
  1. Every day, read or listen to a poem written by a woman of color and available online.
  2. Every day, select one line (or word or set of lines) to use as the leaping-off point into your own writing.
  3. Write this line on a fresh page outside the blog environment: a notebook or computer document.
  4. Using a timer, write for 5 minutes, drawing from your own experiences, questions and observations.
  5. Read what you just wrote. This is not your blog post.
  6. Pull out one short line from your own writing and transcribe it below your previous writing.
  7. Again, write for 5 minutes.
  8. Read what you just wrote. This still is not your blog post.
  9. Pull out one short line from the new writing and transcribe it in the space below.
  10. Write for 5 minutes, using this line to start the final loop.
  11. Reread this. Still not your blog post.
  12. Now, having done all this generative, exploratory work, write again—synthesize, refine, edit. Craft a finished paragraph/poem that synthesizes the ideas, feelings, observations and images that issued from the loops. To “craft” is to pay attention to the ways form and content work together to convey meaning. This final short piece may be a “snapshot,” a scene, a nugget of insight, a series of questions…anything that feels complete in its own way.
  13. This is your post! Copy and paste it into a new blog post and publish it. Don’t forget to credit the source author, and to provide a link to their poem.
Here are a few links where you will find many women poets of color, and of course you are welcome to search on your own: Note: “Looping How-to” is posted in the Canvas “Program Resources” Module. It provides a tiny bit more guidance on the looping exercise.