WiSS Process Blog Test Site

A starting point for your Process Blog

Blog Prompt: Week 8

Due:

5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am.

Prompt:

For each post, choose an individual from your life, from literature, from your own writing.

Create a list of the things that individual has taught you; the list should be entitled, “Things That X Taught Me.”

Create a list of the things that the same individual did not teach you; this list should be entitled, “Things That X Did Not Teach Me.”

List items can be short or paragraph-long.

Lists can be in the shape of a list, or can run together as a block of text.

The post can be these lists, or you can “loop” an item from one list or the other in order to arrive at a more synthesized piece.

Blog Community Service:

Throughout the week, read and respond to your classmates’ posts. Remember, critique is reserved for structured workshop settings. Be respectful and encouraging.

Formal Requirements:

  • You may respond with images and/or text
  • All content must be original—of your own making.

 

 

Blog Prompt: Week 7

Due: 5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am.

Objective: Notice what women are saying and how they are saying it.

Prompt:

Each day, pay attention to the things women around you are saying. Listen. Tune in. Eavesdrop.

Listen to the woman next to you in line, the woman on the news, the woman on the phone, the woman in bed next you. Pay attention to what women are saying to each other, to others, and how they are saying it. Pay attention to who you think of as a woman and how you decide this.

Develop an ear for dialogue, for character.

Listen for the ordinary and the extraordinary. Write it down. Try to get it right. Attribute it, being respectful of privacy as appropriate. Capture the important details, but don’t write a character sketch…give your primary attention to what she says and how she says it, not to how she appears or behaves. If the person is a stranger on a bus, for example, attribute her words to “stranger on the 41.” You can mention who she is saying it to: “stranger on the 41 to her toddler.” If the person is a meteorologist, use her name if you like, or just say something like, “KING 5 meteorologist.”

Record as much as you can…choose what stands out…or choose what doesn’t. Represent the world in its banality if that is what you find most interesting.

You may document just one line per day, or as many as you like.

Don’t use written sources: no books, letters, papers, etc. Only listen.

Blog Community Service: Throughout the week, read your classmates’ posts & respond to at least three. Remember, critique is reserved for structured workshop settings.

Formal Requirements:

  • Every post must be text-based.
  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • There is no minimum or maximum length for this assignment. Keep the publishing format in mind.

Blog Prompt: Week 6

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than next Friday, 10:00am.

Prompt:
Each day, answer one of the 12 questions from Bhanu Kapil’s The Vertical Interrogation of Strangers. Indicate which question you are answering by including it either at the top or bottom of your post.

  1. Who are you and whom do you love?
  2. Where did you come from / how did you arrive?
  3. How will you begin?
  4. How will you live now?
  5. What is the shape of your body?
  6. Who was responsible for the suffering of your mother?
  7. What do you remember about the earth?
  8. What are the consequences of silence?
  9. Tell me what you know about dismemberment.
  10. Describe a morning you woke without fear.
  11. How will you / have you prepare(d) for your death?
  12. And what would you say if you could?

Blog Community Service:
Throughout the week, read & respond to at least 3 posts made by classmates. Use the program website “Blog Hub” for a list of each others’ process blogs. Remember, critique is reserved for structured workshop settings.

Formal Requirements:

  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • Your posts should average between 150-250 words, but this is just a loose reference…no actual requirement or limit.

Blog Prompt: Week 4

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than next Friday, 10:00am.

Objective:
“I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking.” Christopher Isherwood.

Attempt to write as if you are a camera, not thinking, only recording, capturing the essence of a scene, a moment, an event, a person…rather than explaining.

Prompt:
Using words, capture one or more “snapshots” per post.

Try not to use abstract words like “amazing,” “ugly,” “beautiful,” “incredible,” etc.

Capture descriptive details of action, setting, objects, and people. Be specific. Be concrete.

Resist indirect discourse: thoughts and feelings that cannot be observed.

Blog Community Service:
Throughout the week, read and respond to your classmates’ posts. Remember, critique is reserved for structured workshop settings. Be respectful and encouraging.

Formal Requirements:

  • Every post must be text-based.
  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • There is no minimum or maximum length for this assignment. Keep the publishing format in mind.

 

Blog Prompt: Week 3

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am.

Objective:
Using the looping technique practiced in class and to create your posts last week, use the writing of your classmates to expand your view and deepen your inquiry of personal and cultural narratives through creative writing. Keep in mind ideas explored during Day of Absence/Day of Presence…notice how you are absent and/or present in the writing of others and in your own writing…notice who is absent and who is present in your own writing. Any given narrative leaves out almost all of life; notice the choices you make about what and who  to make space for and how.

Prompt:

  1. Every day, read a variety of your classmates’ blog posts from the previous week. Make it your aim to have read at least one post by each classmate by the end of the week.
  2. Every day, select one of these posts to use as the leaping-off point into your own writing. Work from a variety of people’s posts—a different classmate each day. Choose posts that inspire you in a variety of ways; choose some you relate to and others that are foreign to your own experience/understanding/style.
  3. Draw one line from the selected post.
  4. Write this line on “a fresh page” outside the blog environment.
  5. Write for 5 minutes, drawing from your own experiences, questions and observations.
  6. Read what you just wrote. This is not your blog post.
  7. Pull forward one line.
  8. Write this line on “a fresh page.”
  9. Again, write for 5 minutes.
  10. Read. This still is not your blog post.
  11. Select a line.
  12. Use this line to start the final loop; write it on a fresh page.
  13. Write for 5 minutes.
  14. Reread this. Still not your blog post.
  15. Now, having done all this generative, exploratory work, write again—synthesize, refine, edit. Craft a finished paragraph that synthesizes the ideas, feelings, observations and images that issued from the loops. To “craft” is to pay attention to the ways form and content work together to convey meaning. This final short piece may be a “snapshot,” a scene, a nugget of insight, a series of questions…something that feels complete in its own way.
  16. This is your post! Copy and paste it into your blog.
  17. IMPORTANT: At the start of each post, before your own finished writing:
    1. copy the original line you used as your inspiration in quotes,
    2. credit the author by first name only,
    3. hyperlink the line to its source. Use Hypertext How-To for help.

Note: A “Looping How-to” is been posted separately. It provides a tiny bit more guidance on the looping exercise.

Formal Requirements:

  • Every post must be text-based.
  • All content must be original—of your own making.
  • There is no minimum or maximum length for this assignment. Keep the publishing format in mind.

Blog Prompt: Week 2

Week 2 is the week of Day of Absence and Day of Presence. In honor of this, and as a way of informing all the writing and reading and listening and thinking we will do all quarter, this week’s posts will respond to the writing of women of color.

Due:
5-7 posts, uploaded to your blog no later than Friday, 10:00am.

Prompt:
Each day, read or listen to a poem by a woman of color that is available online. Draw a line from that poem as the starting point for the “looping” process practiced in class on Friday of Week 1 and described below. 

Your can choose to make your first post in response to either:

Audre Lorde’s poem, “Power” (1978)

or

Joshua Jennifer Espinoza’s poem, “I Dream of Horses Eating Cops” (2015)

Whichever you don’t use for your first post, you can always use for another!

 

IMPORTANT: At the start of each post, before your own finished writing: Provide the author’s name and the name of the poem that you used as inspiration with a hyperlink to the source. Use “Hypertext How-To” for help, found in Canvas “Program Resources” module.

Looping process:

  1. Every day, read or listen to a poem written by a woman of color and available online.
  2. Every day, select one line (or word or set of lines) to use as the leaping-off point into your own writing.
  3. Write this line on a fresh page outside the blog environment: a notebook or computer document.
  4. Using a timer, write for 5 minutes, drawing from your own experiences, questions and observations.
  5. Read what you just wrote. This is not your blog post
  6. Pull out one short line from your own writing and transcribe it below your previous writing.
  7. Again, write for 5 minutes.
  8. Read what you just wrote. This still is not your blog post.  
  9. Pull out one short line from the new writing and transcribe it in the space below.
  10. Write for 5 minutes, using this line to start the final loop.
  11. Reread this. Still not your blog post.
  12. Now, having done all this generative, exploratory work, write again—synthesize, refine, edit. Craft a finished paragraph/poem that synthesizes the ideas, feelings, observations and images that issued from the loops. To “craft” is to pay attention to the ways form and content work together to convey meaning. This final short piece may be a “snapshot,” a scene, a nugget of insight, a series of questions…anything that feels complete in its own way.
  13. This is your post! Copy and paste it into a new blog post and publish it. Don’t forget to credit the source author, and to provide a link to their poem.

Here are a few links where you will find many women poets of color, and of course you are welcome to search on your own:

Note: “Looping How-to” is posted in the Canvas “Program Resources” Module. It provides a tiny bit more guidance on the looping exercise.

Test Blog Prompt

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