required

week 3 – Thurs, april 18th
Bornstein, David.  Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2010).

week 5 – Thurs, May 1st
Irvine, William B. On Desire: Why We Want What We Want (Oxford University Press, 2007).

week 7 – Thurs, May 15th
Meyerowitz, Joanne. How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States (Harvard University Press, 2004).

week 9 – Thurs, may 29th
Steele, Claude M. Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do (Issues of Our Time) (Norton, 2011).

Recommended

Craig, Leslie. Burning Fence: A Western Memoir of Fatherhood (Picador Press, 2006).

Lareau, Annette. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life (UC Press, 2011).

Beckett, Katherine. Banished: The New Social Control In Urban America (Studies in Crime and Public Policy) (Oxford, 2011).

Roorbach, Bill. Writing Life Stories: How To Make Memories Into Memoirs, Ideas Into Essays And Life Into Literature (Writer’s Digest Books, 2011).

 

Hi,

I reviewed and added comments or approvals to the in program internships that have been posted. Be sure and get this done asap if you are planning an internship. For those of you doing your own programs of learning, you can submit those to me for “draft review” and keep them out of channels.

Now, to get back to me …

 

 

what a dirty yellow bellied rat nixon was. this new information about vietnam and the 1968 election is infuriating. srsly. unbelievable. what might have changed about the last 40 years in the united states if this treason hadn’t been committed?

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 spring quarter
Required in-program contract text

we will go over this again on thursday and/or in your individual evaluation conferences, so don’t panic. follow these instructions one step at a time and you should be okay.

  • Everyone include option 1)
  • everyone include  2) OR 3)
  • everyone transfer verbatim all of this required text as it applies to you
  • everyone compose their own text for everything else

 

1) RE: seminar/shared readings (will count as 4 academic credits) – everyone

  • Learning objective
  • I will develop an academic understanding of current historical circumstances in the united states and explore the structural range of political, economic, and social life chances currently available to my family and myself. I will frame this learning and exploration within the historical knowledge of the united states i have gained in previous quarters of difference and desire.
  • Learning activity
  • I will seminar with my program community on assigned readings in the contemporary sociology and social psychology of race, sex and family structure in the united states. Activities for seminar will include timely, careful and complete readings of assigned materials; historically focused analytical response papers; and full attendance and participation in seminar meetings.
  • Evaluation criteria
  • Faculty will monitor and evaluate my seminar participation and my written reading response papers.

 

2) RE: your specific internship activities and learning goals (will count as 4 academic credits) – internship option only

  • Learning objective
  • I will develop an academic analysis for my internship activities as they fit within a larger theoretical context for the contemporary field of ___________________. (eg, social work, academic advising, youth outreach, women’s activism, artistic entrepreneurship, etc). I also will improve my skills for independent organization, self-directed learning, and successful time management.
  • Learning activity
  • I will plan and conduct independent research, reading, and written reporting from the professional literature of the ___________________ field. I also will maintain a careful and complete log of my internship and learning activities and discuss them regularly, as an individual and in panel teams, within our program community.
  • Evaluation criteria
  • Faculty will evaluate my activities log, as well as notes and formal written responses from my research and reading from the professional literature in my chosen field. Faculty also will evaluate my classroom activities discussions conducted as an individual and in panel teams.
  • note: (those of you who wish can compose your own text for an additional four academic credits related to your internship – by doing additional, deeper research and writing into your field. this is a good option to work on a polished writing example for graduate school or job applications.)

 

3) RE: your specific independent learning activities and learning goals (will count as 4 academic credits) – ILC option only

  • Learning objective
  • I will develop an academic analysis for my independent learning plan as it fits within the larger historical and theoretical issues framed in our shared seminar readings and discussion. I also will improve my skills for independent organization, self-directed learning, and successful time management.
  • Learning activity
  • I will maintain a careful and complete log of my independent study activities and meet weekly with student colleagues and our faculty sponsor for reporting and review. I also will report regularly on my activities, as an individual and in panel teams, within our program seminar and community.
  • Evaluation criteria
  • Faculty will evaluate my activities log, as well as my notes and formal written responses, from my research and reading in my chosen learning plan. Faculty will evaluate my classroom activities discussions conducted as an individual and in panel teams.
  • note: (those of you doing an independent learning plan will compose your own text for the rest of your academic credits. likely this will include experiential learning and/or additional, deeper research and writing into your field. the latter is also a good opportunity to work on a polished writing example for graduate school or job applications.)
 

monday feb 4

reading assignment – ch 5-7 Nonviolent Communication

writing assignment – finish a second draft of your thanks for the memories paper. both drafts are due together at the start of class.

 

thursday feb 7

reading assignmentthe girls who went away

writing assignment – two page summary of the girls who went away – the book, the whole book, and nothing but the book. draft is due at the start of class.

 

friday feb 8

midterm portfolio check – all negatives and contacts sheets from this term (two rolls of film per week for weeks 2-5)

 

writing assignment due thurs in class – write a close summary of Thanks for the memories, a couple of paragraphs for introduction, conclusion, and each chapter. confine yourself to this task and to the content in the book. be sure and spell out the author’s claims and conclusions chapter by chapter. we’ll add our own analysis and ideas in the next draft.

photo assignment - two new contact sheets and two new prints. bring your new contact sheets, negatives and prints to critique on friday.

mon Jan 28

- lecture, writing lesson, NVC discussion

thurs Jan 31

- lecture, seminar on Thanks for the memories, writing lesson

- visit from center for community based learning and action (ccbla)

- no in-class photo lab time this week. self-schedule now and follow through before friday.

fri feb 1

workshop with hugh, photo critique, tba

 

as discussed in class, we have a nice long break until next thursday, but we do not have a vacation. because of the shortened week, we have lots to do.

mon Jan 21

mlk day – no class

thurs Jan 24

due at 12pm:
reading: cannery row

due at 5pm:
photo lab: two new rolls of film w/ contact sheets, two new clean prints

fri Jan 25

due at 12pm:

reading: ch 1-5 nonviolent communication
writing: final draft “who set you flowin”
photo critique: all winter photo work so far

 

writing assignment

as we discussed on monday, please consider and address this question, with special reference to chapters 2 & 3:

How are the larger conditions of early city living reflected in the migration narratives discussed in the  book? give specific examples that point to living conditions, work, leisure, love, family, negotiating race relations – whatever issues are of particular interest to you. prepare your drafts for review by others students in your writing community

- first draft due – in class this Friday jan 18
- final draft due – in class next friday jan 25

here are a couple of very brief resources to look at:

- short essay on african-american migration out of the south in the 1910s
- video excerpt from “up south” documentary
YouTube Preview Image

this entire video is available for us on the open reserve shelf. it is in vhs format but still watchable with vhs equipment in the sound and image library on the library third floor.

also – don’t forget – we’ll discuss the first two chapters of NonVoilent Communciation on Friday, too.

 


1. how have medical and scientific understandings of human reproduction framed social and cultural expressions of sexuality in the american past? (one and two sex models)

2. what are the differences between premodern and modern sensibilities of time and nature? how did the transition from one to the other take place in the U.S.? (circular vs linear thinking)

3. what do we mean by historical empathy and historical memory? how are the two concepts interrelated?

4. how do historians use their primary sources for social history and the history of sexuality? (court cases, laws, letters, diaries, popular books and pamphlets, etc)

5. how did the first settlers view and engage with native american sexuality? how did early settlement and territorial expansion impact native american families?

6. how did childhood and family life differ for diverse groups of americans during the time of slavery?

7. what were the processes of frontier settlement and “civilization building” like along the mississippi river in the mid-nineteenth century? how did life along the river change over time?

8. how did mid-nineteenth century urbanization of cities and class formation spur the emergence of victorian sexuality? what was the civil war’s impact in this process?



9. what challenges did african American families face after emancipation and during reconstruction?

 

Monday workshops

wks 2-9 – Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, Marshall B. Rosenberg, Arun Gandhi


Thursday seminars

wk 1 – Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America, Third Edition, John D’Emilio, Estelle B. Freedman – Pts 1 & 2 – 170 pages

wk 2 – “Who Set You Flowin’?”: The African-American Migration Narrative (Race and American Culture), Farah Jasmine Griffin – 200 pages

wk 3 – Cannery Row, John Steinbeck – 192 pages

wk 4 – Thanks for the Memories: Love, Sex, and World War II, Jane Mersky Leder – 186 pages

wk 5 – The Girls Who Went Away: The Hidden History of Women Who Surrendered Children for Adoption in the Decades Before Roe v. Wade, Ann Fessler – 320 pages

wk 6 – Make Love, Not War: The Sexual Revolution: An Unfettered History, David Allyn – 300 pages

wk 7 – Stayin’ Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class, Jefferson R. Cowie – 350 pages

wk 8 – The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures, Anne Fadiman – 290 pages

wk – 9 The Hustle: One Team and Ten Lives in Black and White, Doug Merlino – 290 pages

wk 10 – Going Up the River: Travels in a Prison Nation, Joseph T. Hallinan – 215 pages


spring break

wk 1 spring – Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America, Third Edition, John D’Emilio, Estelle B. Freedman – Pts 3 & 4 – 200 pages.

 
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