Local Environmental Events!

See Below

Help Nisqually Land Trust Recycle Used Plant Protectors!

If you’ve helped to plant any of the hundred-thousand plus native plants on Nisqually Land Trust property, you probably know about plant protection tubes.  We use these handy plastic tubes to protect the young plants from rodent damage and injury incurred during weed control.  After a few years, the plants outgrow the tubes and we must remove them.  We currently have a large stockpile of these tubes that are ready to be recycled.  We are looking for a volunteer who owns a trailer, and would be willing to deliver the tubes from Yelm to the only known collection center, which is in Tacoma.  If you are able to help us out, we’d sure appreciate it!  Please contact Charly Kearns at 360-489-3400, or email landsteward@nisquallylandtrust.org.

 

South Sound Naturalist at the NEW Hands On Children’s Museum.

South Sound Estuary Association is seeking volunteers to train as South Sound Naturalists to be part of an exciting new partnership with the new The Hands on Children’s Museum (HOCM). The museum features a Tides to Trees area. Training is on-going.  To volunteer or for more information, call Sara Culley at 630-777-5457 or sara@sseacenter.org.

 

Beach Naturalists Needed!

Just a few spaces left for the 2013 Beach Naturalists training which starts April 19.  The Beach Naturalist Program is a hands-on opportunity to work with people who come to our local beaches seeking a personal connection with the water. Beach Naturalists work to create a greater understanding of the South Puget Sound. They learn about the amazing diversity of creatures who live there and talk with people about how everyday choices can have a positive impact on our water quality.  For more information, go to http://sseacenter.wordpress.com/beach-naturalist-2012-schedule. If you are interested in becoming a trained Beach Naturalist, contact Leihla at 360-888-0565 or leihla@sseacenter.org.

 

Volunteers Needed for Field Trips to Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge

Serve the community by assisting on 3rd & 4th grade field trips during the spring shorebird migration!  All age volunteers are needed to provide a safe educational experience to young students!  Each field trip is just a two-hour service commitment and trips are held rain or shine.  Field trips will be held April 22, 24, 29-30, and May 1, 3, 6-9.  A training with refreshments will be held for new and returning volunteers at two locations. Please pick the date/location that best suits your schedule.  Training 1: Hoquiam Library Basement, Saturday, April 6, 10-11:30am.  Training 2: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge VC, Sunday, April 7th 10-11:30 am.  Contact: Lindsay Loftin at (360)753-9467, lindsay_loftin @fws.gov

 

Volunteers Needed for South Puget Sound Regional Envirothon (May 2)

The South Puget Sound Regional Envirothon is a competition for high school students, centered on natural resources: aquatics, forestry, soils and fish and wildlife.  This year’s environmental issue is Sustainable Rangeland Management: Achieving a balance between Traditional Agricultural Uses with Non-Agricultural uses on Montana Rangelands. Regional level competitions are organized and hosted every year by local not-for-profit conservation districts, and the South Puget Sound Regional Envirothon has been hosted by the Thurston Conservation District since 1994.  We are dedicated to the education of youth in natural resources and, with your help, would like to continue to offer this important learning experience to the youth in our community.  How It Works: Teams of five students, from high schools throughout Grays Harbor, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pierce and Thurston Counties, compete first at our regional level Envirothon.  Winning teams from each county advance to the Washington State Envirothon, where they compete for a chance to visit the national level, at the Canon Envirothon. National winners compete for a variety of scholarships.

Volunteers are needed to help with administering tests, setting up workstations and the general flow of the event. If you are interested in volunteering to help, please contact Greg Dunbar, Thurston Conservation District’s Environmental Stewardship & Outreach Coordinator, at (360) 754-3588 ext. 105 OR TcdAmericorps@thurstoncd.com.

 

 

 

RECURRING EVENTS

Tuesdays:

          9 am – 3 pm: South Sound Prairie Restoration Work Party.  (See specific dates below for details.)

7 pm: Olympia City Council (Olympia City Council Chambers: 601 4th Ave E) Go to http://olympia.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx for more information.

            7 pm (1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month): Tumwater City Council (Tumwater City Hall: 555 Israel Rd. SW) Go to www.ci.tumwater.wa.us/ccagendasTOC.htm for more information.

Wednesdays:

            8-11 am: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Bird Walk (Meet at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center Overlook at 8 am, and join Phil Kelley from Black Hills Audubon Society for as long as you wish.)

Thursdays:

            7 pm (2nd & 4th Thursday of the month): Lacey City Council (Lacey City Hall: 420 College Street)  Go to www.ci.lacey.wa.us/city-government/city-council/city-council-2/city-council-meetings/council-meetings for more information.

 

 

Tuesday, April 9

9 am – 3 pm – South Sound Prairie Restoration Work Party

We will be back at Glacial Heritage Preserve. Our activities for the day include broom pulling, preparing for Prairie Appreciation Day, and any other work as the need arises. As always, please bring gloves, rain gear, a box lunch, and water.  Directions to Glacial Heritage:  take I-5 to exit 95 (the Littlerock exit), ~10 miles south of Olympia; go west into Littlerock; continue going straight through Littlerock—do not take any turns, and follow the road (128th Ave) until it ends at Mima Road/Waddell Creek Road; turn south (left) on Mima Road and go 2.7 miles; take a left onto a gravel road with sign for Glacial Heritage—there will be a tractor sign shortly before the turn.  Please obey the 15 mph speed limit, as there are often dogs and small children active nearby.  Follow the road through the gate; take the first right, and then stay to the left to get to the house. For more information, contact ssvolunteers@cnlm.org. Sponsored by The Center for Natural Lands.

The Center for Natural Lands officially took over the South Puget Sound Program of The Nature Conservancy in 2011.  CNLM will continue the South Sound Program’s focus on conserving the rarest habitats of the area’s prairies, oak woodlands and freshwater systems of the Black River. The major projects are: assisting Joint Base Lewis-McChord with restoration and conservation of their lands; restoring prairies and oak woodlands throughout the South Sound region by assisting public agencies, non-profit organizations and private landowners with pest plant control, native habitat enhancements and prescribed fire; promoting conservation of prairies and oak woodlands throughout the Northwest, via the Cascadia Prairie Oak Partnership; producing native plants and seed for use in restoration of prairies and oak woodlands, including partnering with the Sustainable Prisons Project to reduce costs and improve inmates’ well-being.; conserving the Black River and surrounding natural lands; and conducting, and facilitating cutting-edge science that helps the effectiveness and efficiency of conservation actions.

9:30 am – 12 pm – Priest Point Park work party

(Olympia)  Your participation is needed to prepare a site for Earth Day planting. Join the ongoing restoration efforts at historic Priest Point Park.  We will be removing invasive English ivy and other invasive plants to prepare the site for a major planting.  Meet near kitchen shelter #2. Priest Point Park is located at 2600 East Bay Drive NE.  Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Youth under age 14 must be accompanied by an adult and all youth under 18 years must have a signed Waiver and Medical Alert (available at http://olympiawa.gov/~/media/Files/Parks/Volunteering/WAIVER%20Form.ashx) or have a parents’ signature on the sign-in roster at the project work site. Tools, gloves and refreshments will be provided.  For more information, contact Christina Newman ‎(City of Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation) at cnewman@ci.olympia.wa.us or (360) 753-8365.

6 – 8 pm – South Sound Estuary Association Annual Meeting

(Friends Meeting House: 3201 Boston Harbor Road; Olympia)  The program will include an update on our current activities and upcoming projects, a presentation by George Sharp (“SSEA – Becoming an Economic Driver in the South Sound”), volunteer recognition, and seafood, salad and dessert.  Learn what SSEA is up to now and plans for the future.  RSVP is required: go to https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?llr=xcpwlrdab&oeidk=a07e77ogyce030139df.

 

Wednesday, April 10

7 pm – Day Hiking in Eastern Washington

(Tacoma Nature Center: 1919 S Tyler St; Tacoma 98405)  See the description for the April 8 event in Olympia.  Directions: From Interstate 5, take State Highway 16 towards Gig Harbor; look for the 19th Street EAST, exit and take it, which puts you onto South 19th Street; travel to the first light, turn right on South Tyler, and then left into the first driveway at the Tacoma Nature Center.

7:30-8:45 pm – Celebration of the Species: Crows with John Marzluff and Tony Angell 

(Olympia Timberland Library)  Marzluff and Angel, authors of Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion, and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave Like Humans, will tell fascinating, true stories of surprising crow behavior. The authors will explain the engrossing, breakthrough science that accounts for this behavior, as well as arresting illustrations of the crow’s antics and anatomy.  (This is part two of a four-part series to celebrate the Procession of the Species.) Copies of the book will be available for purchase. The program will occur after regular library hours.

 

Thursday, April 11

11 am – 9 pm – Don’t Drip and Drive!  FREE vehicle leak inspections

(South Puget Sound Community College, Bldg. 16)  Motor oil and other automobile fluids are polluting Puget Sound and other waterways.  Just think of all the drips and stains you see in streets and parking lots: much of this leaked fluid washes into local storm drains and eventually into local streams, lakes, rivers, and Puget Sound.  Even small amounts of spilled or dumped oil can contaminate entire stretches of shoreline, shellfish growing areas, and recreational attractions.  Do you know if your vehicle is leaking fluids?  The inspection takes less than 15 minutes and takes place inside SPSCC’s automotive building.  No reservation needed.  For other mechanic shops participating in this free April event, go to www.finditfixit.org.

4:00 – 5:00 pm – Estimating Black Bear Minimum Population Size in Gustavus, Alaska: Implications for Determining the Effect of Human-Caused Mortality on Population Size

(The Evergreen State College, Lecture Hall 2)  Kyle Pinjuv will be presenting on his Masters in Environmental Science thesis.  The public is welcome to attend.  The abstracts is available at http://evergreen.edu/mes/thesispresentation.htm.

5-6 pm – Purple Martin Monitoring Training

(Olympia)  Join us at East Bay Park to learn how to identify purple martins and how to record your sightings.  No experience neccessary!  To register and get more information, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.

7 – 9 pm – Black Hills Audubon monthly Meeting presentation: Whales and More!

(First Christian Church meeting hall: 701 Franklin Street in downtown Olympia)  John Calambokidis from Cascadia Research in Olympia will talk about his research on large whales off the west coast and nearer to home in our Salish Sea.  He’ll also discuss new developments on the return of Harbor Porpoise, Bottle-nosed Dolphins and much more. Arrive at 7:00 pm to socialize—program begins promptly at 7:30 pm.

7:00 pm – Peter Schafer Reid, author of Schafer State Park

(Orca Books: 509 E. 4th Ave, Olympia 98501)  Orca Books is delighted to welcome Peter Schafer Reid to the store to discuss his new book about Schafer State Park.  Schafer State Park, a US National Historic Site, not only represents a unique example of 1930s craftsmanship from the Works Progress Administration and other emergency programs but is also a window into the settlement of the Satsop River Valley. In the last quarter of the 19th century, this included the vast logging and lumber operations undertaken at the park and in the surrounding forest, as well as the bounty available from the river stretching far back into the history of Native Americans in the Northwest. It also memorializes an early example of philanthropy by private citizens and corporations in Washington State, an effort that has continued over the years and has been crucial to the expansion of the state park system.

 

Friday, April 12

9:30 am – 12 pm – Priest Point Park work party

(Olympia)  Your participation is needed to prepare a site for Earth Day planting. Join the ongoing restoration efforts at historic Priest Point Park.  We will be removing invasive English ivy and other invasive plants to prepare the site for a major planting.  Meet near kitchen shelter #2. Priest Point Park is located at 2600 East Bay Drive NE.  Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Youth under age 14 must be accompanied by an adult and all youth under 18 years must have a signed Waiver and Medical Alert (available at http://olympiawa.gov/~/media/Files/Parks/Volunteering/WAIVER%20Form.ashx) or have a parents’ signature on the sign-in roster at the project work site. Tools, gloves and refreshments will be provided.  For more information, contact Christina Newman ‎(City of Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation) at cnewman@ci.olympia.wa.us or (360) 753-8365.

 

Saturday, April 13

8:30 am – 12 noon – Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Experience the thrill of seeing a Peregrine Falcon (the world’s fastest bird) or of hearing a woodpecker pecking away (up to 20 pecks per second)! Join experienced birder David Richardson for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures: The birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

9 am – noon – Powell Creek Scotch Broom Pull with Nisqually Land Trust

(Yelm)  Join Nisqually Land Trust as they remove invasive Scotch Broom from a site near the Nisqually River.  We want to pull as much as we can before it seeds in the summer time! It’s another small step in restoring this area to its original riparian habitat. We hope you can join us!  Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions: go to https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?llr=jzh7gggab&oeidk=a07e7arbfcv3f87e81f.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

9:00 am – Capitol Land Trust Daffodil Dally

(Westside Olympia)  Come see some of the work done by McLane Elementary School students and tour one of the properties preserved by Capitol Land Trust.  We will gather at the McLane Elementary School, then wander down the McLane School Trail to Triple Creek Farm located along the shores of lower Eld Inlet.  Along the way, our guide–Ralph Munro—will share with you the many projects accomplished by McLane School kids and point out the incredible variety of unique trees planted along the trail.  Once we reach the Farm, you will get a tour of this beautiful property conserved by Capitol Land Trust, with details on its history and current restoration projects.  And yes, plenty of daffodils all along the way, which should be in full bloom by then!  We will finish the walk at Ralph’s lovely home, where you will be served hot drinks and treats.  Some may want to walk back along the trail to their car, but for those that don’t we will have a shuttle.  This is an easy 2.5 mile walk (approximately) along relatively flat terrain.  Suitable for all ages.  Join us rain or shine!   The event is free, but you do need to RSVP by calling or emailing Kathleen at (360) 943-3012 or kathleen@capitollandtrust.org.

9 am – 12 pm – Friends of Franklin Park Forest Cleanup and Restoration

(Tacoma)  Join us for our monthly work party at Franklin Park as we continue working on the wooded area in the northeast portion of the park (forested portion along South 12th Street).  We will be pruning low branches on trees, cleaning out the understory, and pulling out invasive plants.  Our goal is to develop this portion of the park into a safer and more inviting area for walking and other recreational activities.  Tools, snacks, and water will be provided but please bring your own gloves. Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

9 am – 12 pm – Julia’s Gulch Work Party

(Tacoma) We will be cutting and digging up blackberry roots along the road and in the lower Gulch, and weeding in the upper area.  We have some tools but if you have a favorite bring it along.  Pitch forks, clippers and loppers are good for the blackberries.  If you plan to tackle the blackberries wear long sleeves, long pants, heavy gloves and heavy footwear.  Please bring your own water but tea and treats will be provided.  We will meet at the picnic table overlooking the Gulch. Cars can be parked at View Point Park.  Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

9 am – 12 pm – Puget Creek Restoration Society Work Party

(Tacoma)  Contact Scott Hansen at pugetcreek@yahoo.com or (253) 779-8890 for exact meeting location of the work party.

9 am – 12 pm – Wapato Hills Clean-up Party

(Tacoma)  Join fellow volunteers as work continues to clean-up Wapato Hills Urban Wildlife Habitat.  This work party meets on the second Saturday of each month, and is currently removing invasive species and doing general clean-up.  Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

10:00 am – 1:00 pm – Wetland Restoration at Hale Preserve

Join Capitol Land Trust as we remove invasive scotch broom and plant live willow stakes to help restore part of this wetland complex on the Hale Preserve, located along Lilly Road, about 5 miles northeast of Olympia. For more information and to RSVP, email our Stewardship Coordinator Guy Maguire at guym@capitollandtrust.org

10 am – 3 pm – Yowkwala invasive species removal and clean-up

(Tacoma) For more information, contact Jeanine Riss at jriss@healthybay.org.

10:00 am – 1 pm – Park of Seven Oars work party

(Olympia)  Please come join us at Park of Seven Oars for some much-needed landscaping. We’ll be weeding, removing Himalayan blackberry, cleaning up graffiti and sheet mulching. Park of Seven Oars is located at 202 West Bay Drive NW. The park is in between the upper and lower 4th Ave/Harrison round-a-bouts. Parking is limited to surrounding street parking. Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Youth under age 14 must be accompanied by an adult and all youth under 18 years must have a signed Waiver and Medical Alert (available at http://olympiawa.gov/~/media/Files/Parks/Volunteering/WAIVER%20Form.ashx) or have a parents’ signature on the sign-in roster at the project work site. Tools, gloves and refreshments will be provided.  For more information, contact Christina Newman ‎(City of Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation) at cnewman@ci.olympia.wa.us or (360) 753-8365.

10 am – 1 pm – How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Never again let nature’s beauty escape your lens! In this hands-on workshop with writer and photographer Greg Farley, you will learn to take your camera off the “automatic” settings and then head outside to apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques. Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot), extra batteries and a sense of adventure! Meet in the Visitor Center auditorium.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

10 am – Olympic Mudminnow Presentation and Field Trip

Lecture: 10 – 11:30 am at LOTT WET Science Center (500 Adams St NE, Olympia)

Field Trip: Noon – 1:30 pm at Evergreen Park Drive and Kaiser Road (van will be available)

Join Stream team and fisheries biologist, Jamie Glasgow to learn about this small endemic fish that resides only in Western Washington!  For more information, and to register online, visit www.streateam.info and click on “Register”.  Staff contact: Michelle Stevie, mstevie@ci.olympia.wa.us.

 

Sunday, April 14

10:30 am – 12:30 pm – Kennedy Creek Shorebird Field Trip

Watch flocks of western sandpipers, dunlins and black-bellied plovers feed along the mudflat shoreline as the tide changes. Join us for a field trip to Kennedy Creek estuary to observe the shorebird migration and to learn of the importance of estuaries for migrating shorebirds.  Field trip speaker, Joe Buchanan is a wildlife biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and on his own time, he has been monitoring shorebird migration at Kennedy Creek estuary for over 30 years.  Volunteers interested in citizen monitoring opportunities will learn how to record birding observations and how your observations can help track bird populations in South Puget Sound.  (Van leaves Thurston County Building #4 (929 Lakeridge Dr. SW, Olympia) at 10 am)  For more information and to register online for the field trip, visit www.streamteam.info and click on “Register”.  Staff contact: Michelle Stevie, mstevie@ci.olympia.wa.us

1-2:30 pm – The Nisqually and Medicine Creek: Where Nature, Culture and History Converge

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Learn about the events surrounding the signing of the Medicine Creek Treaty; explore how the Nisqually people came to the Nisqually delta and how their lives changed with the settlement of Europeans. Lynn Corliss leads you down history’s winding path, where you will discover important things about the people who enjoyed this land before you did. Meet at the flagpole in front of the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

1 – 5 pm – Crazy About Art and Nature? Create ecosystem stories with batik art

Learn the ancient technique of batik, wax painting on cloth, to capture your favorite Stream Team memory or South Sound natural place. Draw a simple design, wax and paint. It’s that simple and fun! Then, turn your batik design into a beautiful wall hanging.  All supplies and instruction provided at the Procession of the Species Art Studio.  Young artists will have the opportunity to have their batik designs on display at Olympia’s new City Hall for Arts Walk on April 26 and 27.  For more information and to register online, visit www.streamteam.info and click on “Register”.  Staff contact: Michelle Stevie, mstevie@ci.olympia.wa.us.

3 – 5 pm – Sprouting 4 Life!

(Olympia)  Join live food chef and educator Rebeka Gentian in sprouting 4 life! Sprouting increases the nutrient density of food, provides trace minerals, essential amino acids, & is extremely affordable. Come learn how to sprout a garden in your kitchen! Vegan, Gluten-free.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Monday, April 15

6:30-9 pm – Bears to Barnacles: Incredible Animals of the Salish Sea

(Olympia)  Want to know more about the Salish Sea and the creatures who live there?  Dr. Gaydos is the one who knows!  The largest octopus. The biggest barnacle. The most enormous anemone. Our backyard is home to some of the most extraordinary creatures on the planet. The Salish Sea’s unique combination of geology and hydrology makes it one of the most biologically diverse and productive inland seas.  Come hear about some of the biggest, longest lived and most unusual animals in the Salish Sea when Joe Gaydos, wildlife veterinarian and chief scientist of the SeaDoc Society, speaks on the web of life in our coastal ecosystem. In this entertaining presentation discover the unexpected connections between land and sea that Joe Gaydos and collaborators uncovered in their recent landmark compilation of all the birds and mammals of the Salish Sea.  Sponsored by Capitol Land Trust and South Sound Estuary Association.  The event will be held at the LOTT WET Science Center (500 Adams NE, Olympia).  To register, go to http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=xcpwlrdab&oeidk=a07e73pc3offf37a463.

Tuesday, April 16

9 am – 3 pm – South Sound Prairie Restoration Work Party

(Details forthcoming)  For more information, contact ssvolunteers@cnlm.org. Sponsored by The Center for Natural Lands.

The Center for Natural Lands officially took over the South Puget Sound Program of The Nature Conservancy in 2011.  CNLM will continue the South Sound Program’s focus on conserving the rarest habitats of the area’s prairies, oak woodlands and freshwater systems of the Black River. The major projects are: assisting Joint Base Lewis-McChord with restoration and conservation of their lands; restoring prairies and oak woodlands throughout the South Sound region by assisting public agencies, non-profit organizations and private landowners with pest plant control, native habitat enhancements and prescribed fire; promoting conservation of prairies and oak woodlands throughout the Northwest, via the Cascadia Prairie Oak Partnership; producing native plants and seed for use in restoration of prairies and oak woodlands, including partnering with the Sustainable Prisons Project to reduce costs and improve inmates’ well-being.; conserving the Black River and surrounding natural lands; and conducting, and facilitating cutting-edge science that helps the effectiveness and efficiency of conservation actions.

6:30 – 9:30 pm – Olympians Against Frackin’ the Bakken – Port Fracking Resistance

(Traditions Café: 5th and Water Street; Olympia 98502)  We will besetting up free food (potluck, bring your own utensils please), then will follow with speakers, music, and some streaming video. We are working on the lineup and will update as things are firmed up.  For details, go to http://omjp.net/2013/03/12/olympians-against-frackin-the-bakken.

 

Let It Soak In: Free Two-Part Rain Garden Workshop

            Part I: Thursday, April 18 • 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. • Tumwater Fire Hall

            Part II: Thursday, April 25 • 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. • Tumwater Fire Hall

Creating a home rain garden is a great way for you to make a big difference in protecting local waterways and Puget Sound, while also beautifying your yard.  Rain gardens are shaped and sized to fit your yard and are planted with a variety of flowers, shrubs and ornamental grasses. Rain gardens act like a native forest by collecting, absorbing and filtering stormwater runoff from rooftops, driveways, patios and other areas around our homes that do not allow rainwater to soak back into the groundwater.  Join us for a free, two-part hands-on workshop to learn how to add one of these lovely “stormwater” features to your yard. The workshop will give you all the details you need to design and install a beautiful rain garden that will manage your home’s stormwater drainage while protecting local water resources.  The instructional workshop on April 18 will focus on developing a sizing and planting plan right for your home landscape. At an optional session on April 25, participants will receive assistance reviewing draft rain garden plans they will have learned how to create in Part 1.  Participants will receive a free, full-color rain garden poster and a free copy of WSU’s Rain Garden Handbook for Western Washington Homeowners.  Workshops are free and registration is required, as space is limited. Visit www.streamteam.info and click on “Register”.  Co-sponsored by Stream Team and WSU Native Plant Salvage Project.

 

Wednesday, April 17

7:30-8:45 pm – Celebration of the Species: Whales with John Calambokidis 

(Olympia Timberland Library) John Calambokidis will share stories about his adventures as a whale expert whose research has taken him to oceans far and wide tracking the behaviors and travels of Gray, Blue, and Humpback whales. John will show results of his original research including photos, videos, some specimen/research material, and jaw dropping stories about encounters with some of the most amazing beings on the planet.  (This is part three of a four-part series to celebrate the Procession of the Species.) The event will occur after regular library hours.

 

Thursday, April 18

8:00 am – 12:00 pm – Black Hills Audubon field trip: Eagle’s Pride Golf Course at Joint Base Lewis-McChord

Join us for a field trip to a new site. We’re planning on making this a monthly nature/bird watching trip on the 3rd Thursday of each month throughout the year. Security passes are NOT required. This trip will be from 1-3 miles long on relatively level ground. It will explore forest, water, and open area species. Trip starts promptly at 8:00 am at the driving range parking lot. Location: Exit 116 (Mounts Road), turn north, turn right into Eagle’s Pride Golf Course clubhouse parking area, go down ramp and make an immediate, hard left onto driving range access road (narrow road). Proceed to driving range parking area. For more information contact David Wienecke at david.l.wienecke.naf@mail.mil  or 253-964-0341 (office) or 760- 828-8788 (mobile).

10 am – 12 pm – WNPS South Sound Chapter – Native Plant Hike: Fort Steilacoom Park

Hike Description: 340 acres at Fort Steilacoom includes an entire network of trails.  A level terrain hike through Douglas fir woods with trillium and fawn lilies opens into open areas with camas and some uphill ascent.  The hike can be extended with a walk around Waughop Lake, through a Garry Oak woods, or to observe native plantings by park volunteers.  Sturdy walking shoes and rain gear depending on weather.  Directions: From I-5, go west on S 74th St until it ends at Custer Rd W; bear left (southwest) and continue until it ends at Steilacoom Blvd SW. Turn right (west) on Steilacoom Blvd SW and then left (south) on Elwood Dr SW (the road to the north is 87th Ave SW).  Continue to the end of Elwood Dr and park along the road near Fort Steilacoom Park.  For more information, go to www.southsoundchapterwnps.org.

6:30-8:30 pm – Rain Gardens Workshop Part I

(Tumwater Fire Hall: 311 Israel Road SW, Tumwater)  This is Part one of a free two-part workshop in which participants will learn how to design and install a rain garden.  Part one will focus on how to develop a sizing and planting plan for your home landscape.  At the optional part-two session (April 25) participants will receive assistance reviewing draft rain garden plans that they learned how to create in Part one.  All participants will receive a free, full-color rain garden poster and a free copy of WSU’s Rain Garden Handbook for Western Washington Homeowners. To register, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.  For more information contact Krista Elvey at nativeplantsalvage@gmail.com or 360-867-2166.

 

Friday, April 19

9 am – 12 pm – Wetland Habitat Restoration work party

(Tacoma Nature Center: 1919 S. Tyler St; Tacoma)  Join us for our regular stewardship activities as we care for the park by removing invasive plant species, re-planting areas with native plants and helping those plants thrive.  No experience necessary—experienced habitat stewards will guide you through the projects.  Come dressed for the weather and prepared to get dirty.  Bring your own gloves and gardening gear or use what we provide.  All ages are welcome, but children need to be supervised at all times by an adult.  Work parties occur rain or shine!  Call 253-591-6439 for more information.  Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

6:30 pm – film: Last Call at the Oasis (105 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  Last Call at the Oasis brings the issue of an impending shortage of drinkable water out of the vague “over there” of the developing world and right into not only our American backyards, but more importantly our kitchen faucets, right now.  From Las Vegas to Midland, Texas, from California’s Central Valley to Michigan’s cattle yards, Oasis brings to vivid, horrifying light the impacts of water overuse in desert boom towns, carcinogen runoff from industrial plants, fecal toxins leaching into the groundwater, and the “Sophie’s Choice” situation faced by officials who must decide whether to preserve the irrigation that produces 25% of the United States’ food or an otherwise doomed marine ecosystem.   Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

7-9 pm – Black Hills Audubon lecture: Shorebirds Seen on our Coast

(State Capital Museum Coach House: 211 21st Ave SW; Olympia 98501)  In anticipation of the Pacific Flyway spring migration of shorebirds, BHAS is offering a lecture/discussion with Matt Pike on shorebirds seen on our coast. Matt is a regular lecturer at the Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival, as well as other specialized species lectures for BHAS. The cost is $10. Pre-registration is NOT required, but we may be limited in size of audience due to location restrictions. If you have additional questions, please contact Shelley Horn at shelleysmail@me.com.

9:00 pm – film: Empowered: Power For the People (83 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  Is it possible for an entire community to live ‘off the grid’?  Well, it is achievable and it’s happening in Tompkins County, New York. In Empowered: Power From the People, the feat that this East Coast town has accomplished is examined to understand how they did it, and how it could be possible for us all.  Through pointed interviews with residents and city leaders, this informative documentary takes us behind the scenes to reveal how a small town that lives under a blanket of clouds for most of the year has managed to shed its dependence on fossil fuels and local power companies by using sustainable energy methods from wind and solar power to bio-diesel and geothermal energies.  Positive and motivational, Empowered: Power From the People paints an enlightening portrait of a town in the midst of an energy revolution.   Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

 

Saturday, April 20

8:30 am – 12 noon — Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Experience the thrill of seeing a Peregrine Falcon (the world’s fastest bird) or of hearing a woodpecker pecking away (up to 20 pecks per second)! Join experienced birder David Richardson for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures: The birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

9 am – noon – Yelm Shoreline Scotch Broom Pull with Nisqually Land Trust

Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

9 am – 12 pm – McKinley Park Cleanup Work Party

(Tacoma)  Meet down at the new playground and restrooms off of McKinley Ave.  Metro Parks will provide all of the necessary tools and equipment.  Volunteers need to dress for the weather and have work gloves.  Volunteers will be assigned to work in specific areas removing invasive and non-native plants such as English Ivy and blackberry bushes.  Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

9 am – 12 pm – Oak Tree Park Work Party

(Tacoma)  Oak Tree Park is a beautiful and unique 25-acre park located off of South 74th and Cedar Streets.  It protects a Garry Oak woodland community that has become increasingly rare due to a combination of land development and colonization of invasive species of native trees like Douglas fir.  The work at Oak Tree Park on this day will include removal of non-native and invasive plant species, and litter pick-up.  Bring sturdy shoes and clothes to get dirty in.  Optional:  gloves, shovels, rakes, and loppers – some gloves and tools will be provided, but you are encouraged to bring your own if you have them and can bring them.  The east entrance to Oak Tree Park is at the north end of Pine Street South.  Please meet at the end of Pine Street South in the culdesac.   Go to www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=upsgreenspaces@gmail.com&gsessionid=OK and click on the event to find a map.

10 am – 3 pm – Mima Mounds work party  

Aid in facilities maintenance including repairs, sign and trail maintenance, and prairie restoration.  An interpretive walk will be offered near the end of the day for interested volunteers.  Bring work gloves, sturdy shoes, water, and dress for the weather; DNR will provide tools.  This event is eligible for a voucher towards a complimentary Discover Pass.  Directions to Mima Mounds NAP: from I-5, take exit 95; go west on Highway 121 toward Littlerock; from Littlerock, continue west on 128th to “T” in the road; turn right on Waddell Creek Road—Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve entrance is about 1 mile on the left.  For more information, contact DNR Representative, Birdie Davenport at 360-902-1434 or roberta.davenport@dnr.wa.gov.

10:00 am – 12 noon – McLane Creek Nature Trail Work Party

(McLane Creek Nature Trail: 5044 Delphi Rd SW; Olympia 98512)  Help Stream Team and Native Plant Salvage keep the McLane Creek Nature Trail accessible and enjoyable for everyone.  Volunteers will be issued a temporary Discover Pass for this event. To register, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.  For more information, contact Ann Marie Pearce at pearcea@co.thurston.wa.us or 360-754-3355 x6857.

10:00 am – 1 pm – Earth Day Stewardship Event

(Olympia)  The Park Stewardship program is teaming up with Alpine Experience to celebrate Earth Day with a fun and exciting stewardship work party! The goal of the work party will be to remove invasive plants and replant with native vegetation. To register and get directions, go to http://online.activecommunities.com/olyparksartsrec or call 360-753-8380  Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Youth under age 14 must be accompanied by an adult and all youth under 18 years must have a signed Waiver and Medical Alert (available at http://olympiawa.gov/~/media/Files/Parks/Volunteering/WAIVER%20Form.ashx) or have a parents’ signature on the sign-in roster at the project work site. Tools, gloves and refreshments will be provided.  For more information, contact Christina Newman ‎(City of Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation) at cnewman@ci.olympia.wa.us or (360) 753-8365.

10 am – 12 noon – It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalists Art Pavey, Jan Kramer, and Cheri Greenwood on this nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

1 – 3 pm – Connecting Children With What They Eat Through Wild Foraging

(Olympia)  This class will provide valuable information on how to use sustainable wild harvesting to connect your children to the food they eat. By learning about where foods come from, and using all of their senses to experience food in the wild. Children start to appreciate their fresh, local fruits and veggies even more! You will learn some relatives of common foods we buy in the store, as well as some tasty, simple recipes that can be made completely in nature. This class is welcoming to people of all experience level. And we will provide substantial details for beginning foragers.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

4:00 pm – film: The Moo Man (98 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  Featured at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, The Moo Man is a documentary with an ingenious strategy for its fascinating look at the UK dairy industry, focusing on a memorable and unique figure, organic farmer Stephen Hook.  Hook is determined to resist some of the worst trends of that industry, the ongoing consolidation leading to ever-larger entities controlling every aspect.  Rather than hire teams of efficiency experts and consultants to modernize, Hook prefers to establish a more personal touch—both with the cows under his care, and with his customers, too.  Hook is committed to making a better, more satisfying life for the former, and to making fresh, unpasteurized milk available for the latter.  Both require a good deal of work and patience on Hook’s part—and provide no small number of comical interludes, in a documentary that is often very funny.  He names his cows, nurses them when they are injured, and frets over them continually.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

6:00 pm – film: Symphony of the Soil with director Q & A (103 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  We are all familiar with dirt, of course, but how often do we stop to think about what it actually is?  This documentary is not afraid to plunge its hands deep into the rich loam, using the very idea of “soil” to tease open a vastly larger statement about the ecology and environment of the planet on which we live. Drawing from ancient knowledge and cutting edge science, Symphony of the Soil is an artistic exploration of the miraculous substance soil.  By understanding the elaborate relationships and mutuality between soil, water, the atmosphere, plants and animals, we come to appreciate the complex and dynamic nature of this precious resource.  The film also examines our human relationship with soil, the use and misuse of soil in agriculture, deforestation and development, and the latest scientific research on soil’s key role in ameliorating the most challenging environmental issues of our time.  Filmed on four continents, featuring esteemed scientists and working farmers and ranchers, Symphony of the Soil is an intriguing presentation that highlights possibilities of healthy soil creating healthy plants creating healthy humans living on a healthy planet.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

9:00 pm – film: Who Bombed Judi Bari? (93 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  In 1990, environmental activists Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney were on their way to an Earth First! music festival when their car was bombed.  This near-fatal incident resulted in extensive injuries for them both, with Bari and Cherney being arrested for car-bombing themselves. In the documentary Who Bombed Judi Bari? this shocking case is explored in detail.  Through archival news footage and interviews, including Bari herself, who died seven years after the bombing, we are given clues and evidence and suspicions behind this incident that happened many years ago, but still has not been solved.  Telling the gripping story of dedicated environmental activists forced to fight against faceless corporate entities.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

 

Sunday, April 21

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 am – Black Hills Audubon field trip: LOTT Hawks Prairie Reclaimed Water Ponds

(Lacey) This trip to a local multi-use facility is well-suited for both beginning and experienced birders, with amazingly rich birding. We will walk the easy gravel paths around the reclamation ponds, marshes, and vegetation. We should see ducks, raptors, passerines, and wading birds.  Dress appropriately for the weather and bring binoculars. The walk will last about two hours; the walking paths are level.  Pre-registration required.  To reserve a spot, contact Susan at slmarkey@comcast.net or call (360) 438-5663.

11:00 am – 3:00 pm – Earth Day on Oakland Bay

(Oakland Bay Historical Park: 1570 E Agate Bay Road; Shelton)  Join us in celebrating Earth Day at the new Oakland Bay Historical Park!  This family-friendly event features local resource agencies, community groups and citizens coming together to enjoy and learn more about the wondrous natural resources found in Mason County. This year we will also be celebrating the grand opening of Oakland Bay Historical Park.  For more details, go to www.masoncd.org/calender.htmlDirections: Take Highway 3 to Agate Road, turn right and follow Agate Road past Pioneer Primary School. The park entrance is about one half mile past the school on the right (across from E. Julian Road).

10 am – 12 noon – The Photographer’s Eye: The Basics of Outdoor Photography

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Nature photography offers individuals the opportunity to develop their finer naturalist instincts and vision, and the beginner’s eye is often the eye that sees most clearly. With this in mind, experienced Refuge photographer John Whitehead offers guidance in technique and composition, with emphasis on learning to utilizing manual settings in order to more completely capture the image you want to capture. Meet at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

11am – 1 pm – Edible Weeds 101

(Olympia)  Join Kate in exploring edible weeds, which grow in our region. Learn about identifying, collecting and preparing those pesky plants that get in the way of what we choose to grow. Handouts will be provided, including recipes. Samples will be presented as available.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

1-2:30 pm — Our Amazing Plant World

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Spring is the perfect time to experience the Refuge plant life is all its diversity! Join Sally Vogel on a nature walk through the Refuge—all the while learning about plant-insect interactions, adaptations for survival and other interesting facts. You only live once: Stop to smell the flowers! Meet at the flagpole in front of the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

2:30 pm – film: Trashed (98 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  Trashed is a vivid depiction of the alarming global problem of the overwhelming accumulation of what humans throw away and how while we may “take out the trash,” it’s never really gone. Actor Jeremy Irons is your globetrotting host whose tour of indicative waste-overrun locales from Lebanon to Vietnam to Scandinavia and beyond becomes a highly personal awakening to authentic outrage at what he sees and the film shows us.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

5:00 pm – film: Bidder 70  (73 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  In 2008, Tim DeChristopher filed into an oil and gas leasing auction sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.  DeChristopher was posing as Bidder #70 and in the auction he won access rights to 12 parcels of federal land, a total of 22,000 acres, for the price of $1.7 million.  DeChristopher never had any intention of drilling, of course, nor was he remotely capable of raising the money to make good on his bid.  Thus, enter the federal justice system and, eventually, this documentary, which tells the whole story of a unique and courageous act of civil disobedience.  Bidder 70 is a highly inspirational account of DeChristopher’s life since then, including his beliefs on climate change, his activist efforts to bring about necessary political changes to save the future of our planet, and his reflections on his indictment on two federal charges and the current state of our democracy.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

7:30 pm – film: A Place at the Table (84 min)

(Capitol Theater: 206 5th Avenue SE; Olympia 98501)  The revealing documentary A Place at the Table explores the plight of hunger in America.  Underlining the fact that 1 out of 6 people in the US must worry about where their next meal is coming from, the filmmakers set out to put a face on this disheartening statistic.  The film follows several examples of the 50 million people struggling with this too-common reality.  We meet a working single mom whose ‘good’ job still doesn’t pay enough to let her feed her kids properly, and the children whose daily struggle with hunger takes a devastating toll on their young lives. We also hear from experts who are trying to find a solution to this growing problem.  A Place at the Table is a disarming look at a grim reality that has been too long ignored.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.  Part of the Olympia Film Society’s Environmental Film Festival.

 

Monday, April 22

9 am – noon – Earth Day Work Party with Nisqually Land Trust

(Details and location to be announced)  Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

 

Tuesday, April 23

9 am – 3 pm – South Sound Prairie Restoration Work Party

(Details forthcoming)  For more information, contact ssvolunteers@cnlm.org. Sponsored by The Center for Natural Lands.

The Center for Natural Lands officially took over the South Puget Sound Program of The Nature Conservancy in 2011.  CNLM will continue the South Sound Program’s focus on conserving the rarest habitats of the area’s prairies, oak woodlands and freshwater systems of the Black River. The major projects are: assisting Joint Base Lewis-McChord with restoration and conservation of their lands; restoring prairies and oak woodlands throughout the South Sound region by assisting public agencies, non-profit organizations and private landowners with pest plant control, native habitat enhancements and prescribed fire; promoting conservation of prairies and oak woodlands throughout the Northwest, via the Cascadia Prairie Oak Partnership; producing native plants and seed for use in restoration of prairies and oak woodlands, including partnering with the Sustainable Prisons Project to reduce costs and improve inmates’ well-being.; conserving the Black River and surrounding natural lands; and conducting, and facilitating cutting-edge science that helps the effectiveness and efficiency of conservation actions.

3-7 pm – Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Many species of bird, from the tiny Rufous Hummingbird to the majestic Bald Eagle, nest on the Refuge. Check out the avian beauty with longtime birder Shep Thorp, who knows the Refuge backwards and forwards. On this late afternoon guided walk, you are sure to learn something new! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

6:30-8:30 pm – Capitol Land Trust’s Annual Meeting

(Hands On Children’s Museum: 414 Jefferson St. NE; Olympia 98501)  Enjoy appetizers and drinks while exploring the beautiful 28,000 square foot museum and its 150 whimsical, hands-on exhibits!  We’ll have the museum to ourselves for the evening.  Once you’ve had your fill, we’ll be taking you on a visual tour of Capitol Land Trust’s 2012 successes, sharing our current stewardship activities and conservation projects. You’ll also be asked to elect candidates to the board of directors. This is your chance to meet with staff and board, provide valuable input, ask questions and share your thoughts.  RSVP required: email quita@capitollandtrust.org or call (360) 943-3012.

 

Wednesday, April 24

6:30 – 8:30 pm – How to be Healthy on a Raw Food or Vegan Diet

(Olympia)  It is true that adding more vegan raw foods into your diet is a fabulous way to support maximizing your health potential. However, just because your food is “raw” or “vegan” doesn’t mean it is food for you. It is actually quite possible to be very unhealthy and seriously deficient in some key nutrients on a vegan or raw food vegan diet. Come join Doug Walsh, 17 year raw foodist, 25 year vegan, and HealthForce Nutritionals National Educator, as he shares the secrets to creating vibrant health, and being successful long-term on a vegan diet with a high percentage of raw foods.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

7:30-8:45 pm – Celebration of the Species: Wolves with Story Warren 

(Olympia Timberland Library) Wolves are social, intelligent, and beautiful creatures that are in danger due to human policies and culture. Learn about wolf biology, impacts on the ecosystem, management, and their return to Washington State. Story Warren is a middle school student at Nova School in Olympia who has worked with and interviewed wolf experts in Yellowstone National Park.   (This is part four of a four-part series to celebrate the Procession of the Species.) The event will occur after regular library hours.

 

Thursday, April 25

6:30-8:30 pm – Rain Gardens Workshop Part II

(Tumwater Fire Hall: 311 Israel Road SW; Tumwater)  This is the second part of a two-part Rain Gardens Worskhop.  Participants will receive assistance reviewing draft plans that they developed for their home landscapes following the first workshop.  To register and for more information, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.

 

 

April 26-28: Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival

(Hoquiam)  Each spring, hundreds of thousands of shorebirds stop to rest and feed in Grays Harbor during their migration northward. Coming from as far south as Argentina, these Arctic-bound shorebirds are among the world’s greatest migrants, some travelling 15,000 miles. The concentration of birds in Grays Harbor allows birders a great chance to view a number of species and see birds take flight in beautiful formations.  The weekend is filled with activities and a major fund-raising banquet that is used to fund an Americorps position at the Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge. For more information, see www.shorebirdfestival.com.

 

 

Friday, April 26

9 am – noon – Arbor Day Work Party with Nisqually Land Trust

(Details and location to be announced)  Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

9 pm – Luminary Procession

(Downtown Olympia at 5th & Washington)

 

Saturday, April 27

8:00 am – 11:00 am – Black Hills Audubon field trip: Black Lake Meadows

(Olympia) Join Gary Wiles for birding at Black Lake Meadows in southwest Olympia to look for some of our earlier spring migrants, including Rufous Hummingbirds, Orange-crowned Warblers, various swallows, and others. While the typical birding is not astoundingly diverse, there is a steady stream of migrants and resident birds.  There is a limit of 12 for this trip. Birders of all levels are invited. Call Gary at (360) 943-8786 for reservations and directions if needed. Dress for the weather.

9:30 am – 2:30 pm – Gog-le-hi-te invasive species removal

(Tacoma) For more information, contact Jeanine Riss at jriss@healthybay.org.

10 am – 3 pm – Mima Mounds work party  

Aid in facilities maintenance including repairs, sign and trail maintenance, and prairie restoration.  An interpretive walk will be offered near the end of the day for interested volunteers.  Bring work gloves, sturdy shoes, water, and dress for the weather; DNR will provide tools.  This event is eligible for a voucher towards a complimentary Discover Pass.  Directions to Mima Mounds NAP: from I-5, take exit 95; go west on Highway 121 toward Littlerock; from Littlerock, continue west on 128th to “T” in the road; turn right on Waddell Creek Road—Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve entrance is about 1 mile on the left.  For more information, contact DNR Representative, Birdie Davenport at 360-902-1434 or roberta.davenport@dnr.wa.gov.

10:00 am – 1 pm – West Bay Park work party

(Olympia)  Join local Rotarians at West Bay Park to help beautify Rotary Point. We will focus on weeding and removing invasive plants from the park. West Bay Park is located at 700 West Bay Drive. Meet near the covered bike shelter. Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Youth under age 14 must be accompanied by an adult and all youth under 18 years must have a signed Waiver and Medical Alert (available at http://olympiawa.gov/~/media/Files/Parks/Volunteering/WAIVER%20Form.ashx) or have a parents’ signature on the sign-in roster at the project work site. Tools, gloves and refreshments will be provided.  For more information, contact Christina Newman ‎(City of Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation) at cnewman@ci.olympia.wa.us or (360) 753-8365.

4:30 – 7 pm – 19th Annual Procession of the Species Celebration!

(Downtown Olympia, beginning at Legion Way & Cherry Street)  WOW!!  Cancel whatever else is on your calendar!  This is Olympia’s biggest must-be-there event—especially if you have yet to see it!  Literally thousands (literally!) of your friends and neighbors and fellow Olympians dress up as their favorite plant/animal/ecosystem/whatever and join in a massive parade of dance and music to celebrate spring and biodiversity.  For more information and photos of past Processions, go to www.procession.org.

6:30 – 8:30 pm – Vegan Gluten Free Pizza Class (Party!)

(Olympia)  Get ready to create some incredible tantalizing pizzas. We will learn a failsafe pizza dough recipe as well as some fun mouthwatering vegan toppings that will knock yer socks off. Recipes provided. Bring one of your favorite toppings to share and come ready to snack, snarf, and celebrate!  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Sunday, April 28

10-11:30 am — It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalist Donna Snow on a nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

3 – 5 pm – Savory Soups

(Olympia)  Soup makes an easy, inexpensive, and filling weeknight supper. Once you learn a few basic recipes, it’s easy to change them to incorporate what you have on hand. Come and get inspired to make delicious soups with recipes that make enough for a few weeknight dinners or to take for lunch during the week. All soups made in this class are vegetarian and fiber rich.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Tuesday, April 30

9 am – 3 pm – South Sound Prairie Restoration Work Party

(Details forthcoming)  For more information, contact ssvolunteers@cnlm.org. Sponsored by The Center for Natural Lands.

The Center for Natural Lands officially took over the South Puget Sound Program of The Nature Conservancy in 2011.  CNLM will continue the South Sound Program’s focus on conserving the rarest habitats of the area’s prairies, oak woodlands and freshwater systems of the Black River. The major projects are: assisting Joint Base Lewis-McChord with restoration and conservation of their lands; restoring prairies and oak woodlands throughout the South Sound region by assisting public agencies, non-profit organizations and private landowners with pest plant control, native habitat enhancements and prescribed fire; promoting conservation of prairies and oak woodlands throughout the Northwest, via the Cascadia Prairie Oak Partnership; producing native plants and seed for use in restoration of prairies and oak woodlands, including partnering with the Sustainable Prisons Project to reduce costs and improve inmates’ well-being.; conserving the Black River and surrounding natural lands; and conducting, and facilitating cutting-edge science that helps the effectiveness and efficiency of conservation actions.

 

Thursday, May 2

6:00 pm – Woodland Trail Greenway Association planning meeting

(Urban Onion: 116 Legion Way; Olympia)  The Woodland Trail Greenway Association meets the first Thursday of each month.  The meeting room is in the back of the main lobby, not in the restaurant itself!  Food and beverages are available for purchase.  For more information, contact Jack Horton at info@woodlandtrail.org or 360.789.0944—or go to www.woodlandtrail.org.

 

Friday, May 3

9 am – 12 pm – Upland & Forest Habitat Restoration Work Party

(Tacoma Nature Center: 1919 S. Tyler St.; Tacoma)  Join us for our regular stewardship activities as we care for the park by removing invasive plant species, re-planting areas with native plants and helping those plants thrive.  No experience necessary – experienced habitat stewards will guide you through the projects.  Come dressed for the weather and prepared to get dirty.  Bring your own gloves and gardening gear or use what we provide.  All ages are welcome, but children need to be supervised at all times by an adult.  Work parties occur rain or shine!  Call 253-591-6439 for more information.

 

Saturday, May 4

10 am – 1 pm — Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  With spring migration in full swing, the Refuge is all aflutter! Experience the thrill of seeing swallows (four different species) or the “wichity wichity” of the common yellowthroat! Join experienced birder Eric Slagle for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures – the birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

3 – 6 pm – Gnocchi from Scratch (gluten-free)

(Olympia)  Great Italian food includes these “little dumplings” often made from potatoes. With some minor alterations to the instructor’s family recipe, they are an easy and delicious gluten-free option for Italian meals. Learn to make a basic potato gnocchi (gluten-free & dairy free) and spinach-ricotta variation (gluten-free). We will sample these with a tomato marinara and a sage, parmesan and browned butter sauce. Mangia bene! Gluten-free, vegetarian.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

9 pm – Pier Peer at Boston Harbor Marina

(Boston Harbor Marina; Olympia)  Join South Sound Estuary Association for a night-lighting event.  Peer below the waters of Puget Sound and discover the lives of mysterious and beautiful creatures.  Jellyfish, colorful sea slugs, predatory worms and more visit us at the underwater lights.  Learn about the animals of Puget Sound and see them like you never have before!  Bring a flashlight (one per person is ideal) and dress for the weather.  All children must be accompanied by an adult, and children under 5 are not advised.  Registration is required, and the cost is $10/adult; accompanying child 6 and over are free.   To register, go to www.sseacenter.org and click the Pier Peer tab.  Event registration will be closed at ten adults for the safety and enjoyment of participants.

 

Sunday, May 5

9-11 am — It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalist Jan Seguin on this nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

1-2:30 pm – The Nisqually and Medicine Creek: Where Nature, Culture and History Converge

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Learn about the events surrounding the signing of the Medicine Creek Treaty; explore how the Nisqually people came to the Nisqually delta and how their lives changed with the settlement of Europeans. Lynn Corliss leads you down history’s winding path, where you will discover important things about the people who enjoyed this land before you did. Meet at the flagpole in front of the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

3 – 5 pm – How Many Meals Can You Make From One Chicken?

(Olympia)  How far can you stretch one chicken? Can you make it last for 3 meals? 5 meals? In this class we will show you how to get the most out of a whole chicken. We will demonstrate how to cut up a whole chicken and how to roast and carve. We’ll also share some quick, easy, and delicious recipes for using leftover cooked chicken.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

 

May 8-10 (Wed-Fri) Black Hills Audubon field trip: Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

During springtime at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, hundreds of bird songs fill the air, wafted by the breeze over the high desert. At the Refuge Headquarters, lazuli buntings and yellow-headed blackbirds jostle for space at the feeders. Malheur’s austere beauty and diverse, watered habitats attract birds – and birders – from near and far.  BHAS’s own Whittier Johnson will lead a guided field trip to Malheur and other birding hotspots in Harney County during the peak of songbird migration. We expect to see numerous native songbirds, passerines, waterfowl, cranes, swans, raptors, and more. Malheur boasts Sage Grouse leks as well.  Transportation and lodging are left up to you. There are several people interested in carpooling, and we have numerous suggestions for lodging.  Contact Bonnie Wood at 360-943-4612 or bwood2800@gmail.com if you are interested in joining the trip or if you have questions.  There is a $25 fee for the trip, which will offset our guide’s expenses.

 

 

Saturday, May 11

9 am – noon – Powell Creek Herb Robert Weed Pull with Nisqually Land Trust

(Yelm)  Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

10 am – 5 pm – “Naturescaping for Water & Wildlife” Field Class

(Olympia)  Learn how to turn your yard into a lovely year-round landscape that attracts birds, butterflies and amphibians with beautiful plants that require less water and protects the quality of local water bodies.  This full-day class offers more material than our evening workshops (offered in fall and winter) and includes site visits to local landscapes.  A morning classroom session will be followed by field visits to local yards.  Bus transportation will be provided.  Included topics: water-wise ideas for your landscape; keys to attracting birds, butterflies, beneficial insects and amphibians; easy ways to minimize lawn space; how to solve drainage issues with on-site stormwater management; planting for four-season interest; landscaping for tricky areas like slopes; and how simple landscape changes can save you time and money while protecting water quality.  The class is taught by Erica Guttman, WSU Native Plant Salvage Project and Linda Andrews, owner of Patterns in Nature Landscape & Design.  Both instructors have decades of professional experience in horticulture and botany, plus a passion for protecting water and creating wildlife habitat.  Field class is free.  Registration is required, as space is limited: go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.

10 am – 1 pm – How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Never again let nature’s beauty escape your lens! In this hands-on workshop with writer and photographer Greg Farley, you will learn to take your camera off the “automatic” settings and then head outside to apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques. Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot), extra batteries and a sense of adventure! Meet in the Visitor Center auditorium.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Sunday, May 12

10 am – 12 noon – Nature Up Close: Introduction to Macro Nature Photography

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Dew drops on flower petals; the eyes of insects. These details represent the oft overlooked true visual poetry of nature. Join Refuge photographer John Whitehead for discussion, demonstration, and practice of up close nature photography. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

3 – 5 pm – Raw Theory

(Olympia)  Explore the theories of raw food living with live food chef and educator Rebeka Gentian. Topics will include: What is raw? The power of enzymes, proteins & amino acids, macro vs. micro nutrients, the cleansing factor, and the reality of the food chain. Q&A to follow as well as tips on how to make things quick! Vegan, Gluten-free.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Monday, May 13

7 pm – Elwha: A River Reborn

(Washington State Capitol Museum: 211 21st Avenue SW; Olympia)  Lynda V. Mapes will discuss her new book, Elwha: A River Reborn, scheduled for release on May 15.  Lynda Mapes is an environmental reporter for the Seattle Times.  Through interviews, fieldwork, photojournalism, and historical research, Lynda Mapes and Seattle Times have reported on the dam removal process in a series of feature articles.  Elwha: A River Reborn is based on these feature articles.  The book brings out the impact on the Elwha Klallam Tribe awaiting the return of the salmon runs.  It also discusses the unprecedented revegetation effort to restore 700 acres of mudflats.  Join us to hear the story of this unprecedented effort from a reporter who has followed it in depth.  The meeting is open to the public and free of charge.  Sponsored by the Washington Native Plant Society–South Sound Chapter.

 

Saturday, May 18

9 am – noon – Railway Road NatureMapping Field Trip

The Nisqually Land Trust protects over 190 acres along the whitewater reach of the Nisqually River.  This 10+ acre wetland just outside of Yelm is a part of the 150 contiguous acres of riparian forest mosaic located between the Centralia power canal and the Nisqually River.  The land trust needs to collect wildlife data along the Nisqually river, and Northwest Trek has offered to help by organizing citizen-scientists to do the data collection.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in grassy and woody environments and on uneven surfaces. The terrain ranges from level unpaved roads to uneven meadows and forests. Some areas require climbing and maneuvering over debris.  Rubber boots and walking sticks are advised.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

10 am – Free Invasive Plant Identification and Mapping Workshop

Interested in learning how to identify invasive nuisance plants and map them for future eradication?  Join Stream Team and Thurston County Noxious Weed Control nuisance plant expert, Mary Jo Seery to learn about common invasive plants plaguing our parks and cities.  In this workshop, you will learn to identify invasive nuisance plant species and how to record their locations.  An iphone data collection option will also be discussed.  Identifying and mapping locations of these plant species will help managers develop and implement long-range eradication plans.  Bring your enthusiasm!

Lecture: 10-11 am at LOTT WET Science Center (500 Adams St NE, Olympia)

Field trip to Grass Lake: Noon-1:30 pm (vans will be available)

For more information and to register, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event. Staff contact: Michelle Stevie, mstevie@ci.olympia.wa.us

10 am – 1 pm – How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Never again let nature’s beauty escape your lens! In this hands-on workshop with writer and photographer Greg Farley, you will learn to take your camera off the “automatic” settings and then head outside to apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques. Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot), extra batteries and a sense of adventure! Meet in the Visitor Center auditorium.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

6:30 – 8:30 pm – Miso 101

(Olympia)  Miso is a delicious healing food that is easy to make when you have access to the right starter culture. Join Summer Bock, Health Coach, Herbalist, and Fermentationist in this action-packed, hands-on, miso making demo and lecture explaining the health benefits and the science of miso. Vegan, gluten-free.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Sunday, May 19

10-11:30 am – It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalist Donna Snow on a nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Monday, May 20

3:00-6:00 pm – McLane Creek Nature Trail Work Party

(McLane Creek Nature Trail: 5044 Delphi Rd SW; Olympia 98512)  Help Stream Team and Native Plant Salvage keep the McLane Creek Nature Trail accessible and enjoyable for everyone.  Volunteers will be issued a temporary Discover Pass for this event. To register, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.  For more information, contact Ann Marie Pearce at pearcea@co.thurston.wa.us or 360-754-3355 x6857.

 

Saturday, May 25

9 am – noon – Ohop Creek Ivy Pull and Blackberry Control with Nisqually Land Trust

(Eatonville)  Coffee, water, and some light snacks will be provided; please bring a water bottle and anything else you might need.  Work parties are rain or shine.  Bring layers, raingear, and close-toed shoes that you don’t mind getting dirty.  All minors MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  RSVP is required for directions.  For more information, contact Cris Peck at volunteer@nisquallylandtrust.org or (360) 489-3400 x 106.

9-11 am – Birding Basics: Learning to See

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  What subtle cues do experienced birders use to quickly and accurately identify species? Birding is nothing less than the art of seeing, so the techniques used by birders increase awareness of all things natural. Refuge Ranger Michael Schramm will guide you through the estuary’s diverse habitats on an odyssey of avian discovery, all the while teaching the ins and outs of birding. Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center—and remember to bring binoculars!  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Sunday, May 26

3 – 5 pm – Bladeless: Uncooking with Kids

(Olympia)  Encourage kids towards healthy food choices be letting them play with their food. Let’s do it together! Raw vegan food preparation with kids ages 4 and up! Lets discover how yummy healthy food can be in this interactive workshop of live and whole food recipes from “Bladeless,” a raw recipe book for kids of all ages created by Rebeka & Eraelah Gentian. Vegan, Gluten-free.  The cost is $5, and registration is required.  To register and get more information about this and other classes, go to www.olympiafood.coop/classes.

 

Saturday, June 1

10 am – 1 pm — Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  With spring migration in full swing, the Refuge is all aflutter! Experience the thrill of seeing swallows (four different species) or the “wichity wichity” of the common yellowthroat! Join experienced birder Eric Slagle for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures – the birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

10 pm – Pier Peer at Boston Harbor Marina

(Boston Harbor Marina; Olympia)  Join South Sound Estuary Association for a night-lighting event.  Peer below the waters of Puget Sound and discover the lives of mysterious and beautiful creatures.  Jellyfish, colorful sea slugs, predatory worms and more visit us at the underwater lights.  Learn about the animals of Puget Sound and see them like you never have before!  Bring a flashlight (one per person is ideal) and dress for the weather.  All children must be accompanied by an adult, and children under 5 are not advised.  Registration is required, and the cost is $10/adult; accompanying child 6 and over are free.   To register, go to www.sseacenter.org and click the Pier Peer tab.  Event registration will be closed at ten adults for the safety and enjoyment of participants.

 

Sunday, June 2

9-11 am – It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalist Jan Seguin on this nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Saturday, June 8

9 am – noon – Bragett Parcel NatureMapping Field Trip

The Nisqually Tribe trust protects this 50+ acre site adjacent to the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge.  The site is a mixture of estuary, river, forest and meadow, and the diverse habitat creates ideal conditions for a wide variety of wildlife.  Northwest Trek has offered to help collect data on wildlife in the project area using citizen-scientists—which is what today’s event involves.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in a grassy, woody and wetland environments and on uneven surfaces.  Rubber boots are advised for portions of the site.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

10 am – 4:30 pm — Meet the Trees of Washington Field Class

(Thurston County Courthouse, Bldg 1, Rm. 152)  This class is especially beneficial for newcomers to our area or anyone else who has ever wondered about the benefits and horticultural uses of native trees and other plants.  Participants will learn about a variety of different ecosystems found in Western Washington and the plants and animals that inhabit them.  Start the morning with classroom instruction, an introduction to four South Sound ecosystems and some basic hands-on native plant identification.  Then take a field trip to a local nature trail and learn to identify native trees, shrubs, ferns and perennials. Bus transportation is provided for the field trip. Field class is free and registration is required, as space is limited.  For more information and to register, go to http://streamteam.info/getinvolved/calendar and click on the event.

10 am – 1 pm – How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Never again let nature’s beauty escape your lens! In this hands-on workshop with writer and photographer Greg Farley, you will learn to take your camera off the “automatic” settings and then head outside to apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques. Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot), extra batteries and a sense of adventure! Meet in the Visitor Center auditorium.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Sunday, June 9

1-2:30 pm – The Nisqually and Medicine Creek: Where Nature, Culture and History Converge

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Learn about the events surrounding the signing of the Medicine Creek Treaty; explore how the Nisqually people came to the Nisqually delta and how their lives changed with the settlement of Europeans. Lynn Corliss leads you down history’s winding path, where you will discover important things about the people who enjoyed this land before you did. Meet at the flagpole in front of the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Saturday, June 15

10 am – 1 pm – How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Never again let nature’s beauty escape your lens! In this hands-on workshop with writer and photographer Greg Farley, you will learn to take your camera off the “automatic” settings and then head outside to apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques.  Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot), extra batteries and a sense of adventure! Meet in the Visitor Center auditorium.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Saturday, June 22

8:30am – 12noon – Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Experience the thrill of seeing a Peregrine Falcon (the world’s fastest bird) or of hearing a woodpecker pecking away (up to 20 pecks per second)! Join experienced birder David Richardson for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures: The birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

10am – 12 noon – It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crabapples, the Refuge is home to many types of wildlife. Join naturalists Art Pavey, Jan Kramer, and Cheri Greenwood on this nature walk that is sure to teach you something new about the creatures of the Refuge. Meet in the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Saturday, June 29

8:30am – 12noon – Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk

(Nisqually Wildlife Refuge)  Experience the thrill of seeing a Peregrine Falcon (the world’s fastest bird) or hearing a woodpecker pecking away (up to 20 pecks per second)! Join experienced birder David Richardson for a guided walk full of the sights and sounds of one of the Refuge’s largest treasures: the birds! Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the Visitor Center.  The program is free, but there is a $3 fee for entering the Refuge.

 

Saturday, July 6

9 am – noon – Wilcox Flats NatureMapping and Habitat Restoration Field Trip

(near Wilcox Farms in Roy)  The Nisqually Land Trust is looking to gather wildlife data at its Wilcox Flats property along the Nisqually River—a site vital to salmon recovery efforts along the Nisqually River.  Northwest Trek has offered to help by organizing citizen-scientists to collect baseline data about plants and wildlife in the surrounding habitat, and to continue restoration efforts in the meadows and forests along the Nisqually River and side channels.  Today’s field trip will consist of data collection, invasive species removal, and weeding and care of new plantings.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in grassy and woody environments and on uneven surfaces.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

 

Saturday, July 13

9 am – noon – Ohop Creek Restoration NatureMapping Field Trip

(near Eatonville)  The South Sound Salmon Enhancement Group, Nisqually Indian Tribe, Nisqually Land Trust and its partners are working together to restore the creek through the Ohop Valley to its original meandering pathway.  Northwest Trek is helping by using citizen-scientists to collect data on wildlife in the project area—which is what today’s event involves.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in a wet environment on uneven surfaces.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

 

Saturday, September 7

9 am – noon – Red Salmon Creek NatureMapping Field Trip

The Nisqually Land Trust protects this 25+ acre site near the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge.  The site is a mosaic of small coastal streams buffered by narrow forest bands and pastures that have been planted with natives in the last 6 years.  The site also contains a small area of salt marsh at the southwest edge of the property and an active beaver population.  The land trust needs to collect wildlife data at the site, and Northwest Trek has offered to help by organizing citizen-scientists to do the data collection.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking  in grassy and woody environments and on uneven surfaces. The terrain ranges from uneven meadows and forests to riparian and wetland edges. Some areas require climbing and maneuvering over debris.  Rubber boots and walking sticks are advised for portions of the site.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

 

Saturday, September 21

9 am – noon – Powell Creek NatureMapping Field Trip

(near Yelm)  This Nisqually Land Trust property was recently planted to restore natural habitat for wildlife use along the Nisqually River.  The land trust needs to collect wildlife data on the site, and Northwest Trek has offered to help by organizing citizen-scientists to do the data collection.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in grassy and woody environments and on uneven surfaces. The terrain ranges from level unpaved roads to uneven meadows and forests.  Some areas require climbing and maneuvering over debris.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.

 

Saturday, October 12

9 am – noon – Ohop Creek Restoration NatureMapping Field Trip

(near Eatonville)  The South Sound Salmon Enhancement Group, Nisqually Indian Tribe, Nisqually Land Trust and its partners are working together to restore the creek through the Ohop Valley to its original meandering pathway.  Northwest Trek is helping by using citizen-scientists to collect data on wildlife in the project area—which is what today’s event involves.  No previous NatureMapping experience is required, and the event is free.  Participants should come dressed for the weather and for walking in a wet environment on uneven surfaces.  To sign up or for more information, contact Jessica Moore at 360.832.7160 or at Jessica.Moore@nwtrek.org.